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Dan Harland was a legend. A hired gun, Harland had earned a reputation as one of the fastest gunslingers in the West. He didn't like to kill, but he did it with deadly accuracy. The money wasn't too bad, either. However, when he is hired to kill a man who is seemingly all too ready to die, Harland begins to have second thoughts about his occupation and seeks out the shadowy figure who hired him.

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12 Years a Slave is the harrowing account of a black man, born free in New York State, who was drugged, kidnapped, and sold into slavery in 1841. Having no way to contact his family, and fearing for his life if he told the truth, Solomon Northup was sold from plantation to plantation in Louisiana, toiling under cruel masters for twelve years before meeting Samuel Bass, a Canadian who finally put h…

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"Professor Aronnax, his faithful servant, Conseil, and the Canadian harpooner, Ned Land, begin an extremely hazardous voyage to rid the seas of a little-known and terrifying sea monster. However, the monster turns out to be the Nautilus, a giant submarine commanded by the mysterious Captain Nemo, by whom they are soon held captive. So begins not only one of the great adventure classics but also a…

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In A Case of Identity Miss Mary Sutherland, a woman with a substantial income is engaged to a quiet Londoner who has recently disappeared. Of the fiance, Mr. Hosmer Angel, Miss Sutherland only knows that he works in an office in Leadenhall Street. All his letters to her are typewritten, even the signature, and he insists that she write back to him through the local Post Office. The climax of the s…

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In A Christmas Dream, and How It Came True, Ten-year-old Effie lives a comfortable life and experiences Christmases filled with delicious treats and wonderful toys. One night she has a dream that forever changes the meaning of Christmas for her. Encountering a group of underprivileged children, she is inspired to give them a Christmas they will never forget.

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Originally published in the 1850 Christmas edition of Dickens' journal Household Words, A Christmas Tree is considered to be one of Dickens's more autobiographical pieces. In it, decorations on the Christmas tree trigger the narrator's memories of Christmases past. This version of A Christmas Tree is part of Dreamscape's The Christmas Stories of Charles Dickens.

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In A Christmas Turkey, a poor family works hard to figure out how they can celebrate Christmas. When the father is unable to provide a turkey, the children venture out into the world, working to earn enough money to pool their resources and purchase one for the Christmas table.

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In A Country Christmas, Louisa May Alcott tells the story of Sophie, a debutante from the city who travels to rural Vermont to spend Christmas with her cousins Saul and Ruth. Though apprehensive at first, Sophie learns that the charms of celebrating Christmas in the country are many.

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In A Hospital Christmas a Civil War-era hospital is the setting for a Christmas story about caring for others, thinking positively and how sharing can make Christmas meaningful for those who have little.

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In the days when hunger could be cultivated and practiced as an art form, the individuals who practiced it were often put on show for all to see. One man who was so devout in his pursuit of hunger pushed against the boundaries set by the circus that housed him and strived to go longer than forty days without food. As interest in his art began to fade, he pushed the boundaries even further. In this…

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“A Kidnapped Santa Claus is a short story by L. Frank Baum, author of the Oz stories. In it, The Daemons of the caves, resentful of Santa Claus, who rebuffs their attempts to subvert him by temptation, capture him in his sleigh on Christmas Eve and imprison him in their caves. Santa’s helpers: a fairy, pixie, knook, and ryl, finish his deliveries with a few comical mishaps. Assembling a magical ar…

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A Merry Christmas: An Excerpt from Little Women is the famous Christmas scene (Chapter Two) from the immortal Louisa May Alcott novel, Little Women. The four March sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy and their mother, celebrate Christmas without their father who has gone to war. Newly impoverished after father's financial loss, the sisters work outside the home for money to support the family, and redi…

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This is the way the world ends, not with a bang but with a whisper—a whisper of wings! Death has come out of Africa in the form of swarms of vicious African flies. A living plague, these monstrous bugs cannot be battled like some ordinary disease. Medical science is unable to prevent the deadly autoimmune reaction caused by the bite of these insects. Billions are dead and more are constantly dying…

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A New Way to Spend Christmas describes a Christmas visit to Randall's Island in the East River, where orphaned and sick children are looked after. A charitable woman brings gifts and spreads sunshine in that shady place to the unfortunate children who live there.

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The lives of Miss Adela Quested and those around her are forever changed when she befriends a young doctor named Aziz during a trip she and her companion Mrs. Moore make to India. The unlikely friendship between Adela and Aziz eventually culminates in a disastrous expedition to the Marabar caves, during which she offends him, an action which leads to false accusations, arrests, and a litany of mis…

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The first novel by James Joyce, this semi-autobiographical narrative depicts the life of Stephen Dedalus, a character created as an allusion to Daedalus, a craftsman in Greek mythology. Beginning by depicting the early stages of Stephen's life, the language of the novel grows with the main character as he awakens sexually and rebels against religion. When he realizes that Ireland is restricting hi…

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In A Respectable Woman, Mrs. Baroda, the wife of a wealthy sugar plantation owner plays hostess to Mr. Gouvernail, a friend of her husband's. The reserved Mr. Gouvernail is a puzzle to Mrs. Baroda who is nonetheless intrigued by the man's retiring nature. When the two speak to each other outside one evening, Mrs. Baroda wants to get closer to her guest but realizes this would be at odds with her p…

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A short poem that evokes the ambience and spiritual joy of the season, A Song for A Christmas Tree is an ode to the wonders of the Christmas season.

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Brought together by a mutual friend, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson discover that they have much more in common than the fact that they're roommates. As Watson begins assisting Sherlock with his work as a consulting detective, he notices that Sherlock has an uncanny ability to assemble deductions based on seemingly minor details.

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Unjustly imprisoned for 18 years in the Bastille, Dr. Alexandre Manette is reunited with his daughter, Lucie, and safely transported from France to England. It would seem that they could take up the threads of their lives in peace. As fate would have it though, the pair are summoned to the Old Bailey to testify against a young Frenchman - Charles Darnay - falsely accused of treason. Strangely enou…

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Volume 1 in the Adventures by Morse radio series! “If you like high adventure, come with me. If you like the stealth of intrigue, come with me. If you like blood and thunder, come with me...” From the pen of radio’s legendary creator/writer/producer Carlton E. Morse comes two spine-chilling ten-part mysteries from “Adventures by Morse,” a syndicated radio series first broadcast in 1944. Containing…

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Volume 2 in the Adventures by Morse radio series! “If you like high adventure, come with me. If you like the stealth of intrigue, come with me. If you like blood and thunder, come with me...” From the pen of radio’s legendary creator/writer/producer Carlton E. Morse comes two spine-chilling ten-part mysteries from “Adventures by Morse,” a syndicated radio series first broadcast in 1944. Containing…

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Volume 3 in the Adventures by Morse radio series! “If you like high adventure, come with me. If you like the stealth of intrigue, come with me. If you like blood and thunder, come with me...” From the pen of radio’s legendary creator/writer/producer Carlton E. Morse comes two spine-chilling ten-part mysteries from “Adventures by Morse,” a syndicated radio series first broadcast in 1944. Containing…

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First appearing in 1896, Frank Merriwell was a hero and role model for the youth of his time. As described by his creator, Gilbert Patton, 'the name was symbolic of the chief characteristics I desired my hero to have: Frank for frankness, merry for a happy disposition, well for health and abounding vitality.' Merriwell was an athlete, a sports star, and a good student, popular with his peers for h…

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First appearing in 1896, Frank Merriwell was a hero and role model for the youth of his time. As described by his creator, Gilbert Patton, 'the name was symbolic of the chief characteristics I desired my hero to have: Frank for frankness, merry for a happy disposition, well for health and abounding vitality.' Merriwell was an athlete, a sports star, and a good student, popular with his peers for h…

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Frank Race is a cultured and sophisticated investigator who, in his world travels, encounters equal measures of crime, espionage, violence, and attractive but suspicious women. A dashing combination of Johnny Dollar and James Bond, Race began his professional career as a successful attorney but, after a stint with the OSS during World War II, he found his former profession to be far too dull and p…

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Frank Race is a cultured and sophisticated investigator who, in his world travels, encounters equal measures of crime, espionage, violence, and attractive but suspicious women. A dashing combination of Johnny Dollar and James Bond, Race began his professional career as a successful attorney but, after a stint with the OSS during World War II, he found his former profession to be far too dull and p…

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Frank Race is a cultured and sophisticated investigator who, in his world travels, encounters equal measures of crime, espionage, violence, and attractive but suspicious women. A dashing combination of Johnny Dollar and James Bond, Race began his professional career as a successful attorney but, after a stint with the OSS during World War II, he found his former profession to be far too dull and p…

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Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

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Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

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Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

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Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

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Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

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Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

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Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

Learn More

Beginning with Tarzan, the pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He was not a barely-literate loincloth-clad tree-dwelling wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a great white hunter in the mold of heroes of earlier popular fiction such as H. Rider Haggard's Allan Quatermain and Lord John Roxton from Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World, who represented the colonial v…

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In the 1930s, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer purchased the rights to a novel written by author Wilson Collison entitled 'Dark Dame,' which they had planned to film with their platinum blonde glamour gal, Jean Harlow. But Harlow's untimely death put the kibosh on that project, and Collison's work didn't reach the silver screen until 1939 when it was refashioned for MGM's new beauty queen (newly acquired from…

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In the 1930s, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer purchased the rights to a novel written by author Wilson Collison entitled 'Dark Dame,' which they had planned to film with their platinum blonde glamour gal, Jean Harlow. But Harlow's untimely death put the kibosh on that project, and Collison's work didn't reach the silver screen until 1939 when it was refashioned for MGM's new beauty queen (newly acquired from…

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The world was a much different place than we know it today; Venice, with its extreme wealth, was the center of trade for most of the civilized world and the Polo family - Niccolo and his brother Maffeo - were two of its most successful businessmen. Always seeking to enrich their fortunes by forming trading relationships with other lands, the Polo's made it their goal to travel to the Far East - a…

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The world was a much different place than we know it today; Venice, with its extreme wealth, was the center of trade for most of the civilized world and the Polo family - Niccolo and his brother Maffeo - were two of its most successful businessmen. Always seeking to enrich their fortunes by forming trading relationships with other lands, the Polo's made it their goal to travel to the Far East - a…

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Gerald Mohr stars as Raymond Chandler's hard-boiled gumshoe in 'The Adventures of Philip Marlowe', a series based on one of the most popular sleuths in the history of crime fiction. First aired in 1947 with Van Heflin in the title role, Chandler disliked the initial incarnation, dubbing it 'totally flat'. However, in the 1948 revival, Chandler admitted satisfaction, remarking that Mohr's voice 'pa…

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Gerald Mohr stars as Raymond Chandler's hard-boiled gumshoe in 'The Adventures of Philip Marlowe', a series based on one of the most popular sleuths in the history of crime fiction. First aired in 1947 with Van Heflin in the title role, Chandler disliked the initial incarnation, dubbing it 'totally flat'. However, in the 1948 revival, Chandler admitted satisfaction, remarking that Mohr's voice 'pa…

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Gerald Mohr stars as Raymond Chandler's hard-boiled gumshoe in 'The Adventures of Philip Marlowe', a series based on one of the most popular sleuths in the history of crime fiction. First aired in 1947 with Van Heflin in the title role, Chandler disliked the initial incarnation, dubbing it 'totally flat'. However, in the 1948 revival, Chandler admitted satisfaction, remarking that Mohr's voice 'pa…

Learn More

Gerald Mohr stars as Raymond Chandler's hard-boiled gumshoe in 'The Adventures of Philip Marlowe', a series based on one of the most popular sleuths in the history of crime fiction. First aired in 1947 with Van Heflin in the title role, Chandler disliked the initial incarnation, dubbing it 'totally flat'. However, in the 1948 revival, Chandler admitted satisfaction, remarking that Mohr's voice 'pa…

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From run-ins with the Sheriff of Nottingham to gathering the merry men in Sherwood Forest, the tales of Robin Hood are filled with adventure and fun. This abbreviated collection of Robin Hood's most notable exploits both delights and educates while an included read-a-long featurette promotes literacy.

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Among the oldest stories of human civilization, Aesop's fables are a collection of extended proverbs with moral messages attributed to the Greek slave Aesop, who lived in the fifth century B.C. Children will delight in these basic human truths represented by talking animals and plants, and adults will marvel at the plainspoken language of these ancient tales. This translation by Vernon Jones inclu…

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History and Adventure on the High Seas collide in Afloat with Henry Morgan, Volume 1! Restored to the finest sparkling quality possible by Radio Archives, the first 28 episodes of this cliffhanger non-stop serial bring you seven hours of history, mystery, hard men, courageous women, and sea battles galore! Thrill as Privateer Henry Morgan, a real historical figure, becomes involved in the theft of…

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History and Adventure on the High Seas collide in Afloat with Henry Morgan, Volume 2! Restored to the finest sparkling quality possible by Radio Archives, the second 24 episodes of this cliffhanger non-stop serial bring you six more hours of history, mystery, hard men, courageous women, and sea battles galore! Thrill as Privateer Henry Morgan, a real historical figure, becomes involved in the thef…

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The top western stars of the silver screen are featured in the “All-Star Western Theatre”, a highly entertaining series of shows first heard in 1946. Hosted by Cottonseed Clark and highlighted by the music of Foy Willing and the Riders of the Purple Sage, the 20 broadcasts in this collection offer a virtual round-up of singing cowboys, including Tex Ritter, Eddie Dean, Jimmy Wakely, and Ken Curtis…

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Volume 1 in the Amos 'n' Andy radio series! A much loved radio phenomenon for more than thirty years, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” starred Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as a pair of black men who came to the big city in search of opportunity and success. Beginning as a daily serial, the program eventually turned into the weekly situation comedy for which it is best remembered today. Populated with a delig…

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Volume 2 in the Amos 'n' Andy radio series! A much loved radio phenomenon for more than thirty years, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” starred Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as a pair of black men who came to the big city in search of opportunity and success. Beginning as a daily serial, the program eventually turned into the weekly situation comedy for which it is best remembered today. Populated with a delig…

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Volume 3 in the Amos 'n' Andy radio series! A much loved radio phenomenon for more than thirty years, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” starred Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as a pair of black men who came to the big city in search of opportunity and success. Beginning as a daily serial, the program eventually turned into the weekly situation comedy for which it is best remembered today. Populated with a delig…

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Volume 4 in the Amos 'n' Andy radio series! A much loved radio phenomenon for more than thirty years, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” starred Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as a pair of black men who came to the big city in search of opportunity and success. Beginning as a daily serial, the program eventually turned into the weekly situation comedy for which it is best remembered today. Populated with a delig…

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Volume 5 in the Amos 'n' Andy radio series! A much loved radio phenomenon for more than thirty years, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” starred Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as a pair of black men who came to the big city in search of opportunity and success. Beginning as a daily serial, the program eventually turned into the weekly situation comedy for which it is best remembered today. Populated with a delig…

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Volume 6 in the Amos 'n' Andy radio series! A much loved radio phenomenon for more than thirty years, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” starred Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as a pair of black men who came to the big city in search of opportunity and success. Beginning as a daily serial, the program eventually turned into the weekly situation comedy for which it is best remembered today. Populated with a delig…

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Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tales, which have been translated into more than 125 languages, have become culturally embedded in the West's collective consciousness. Readily accessible by children, they present lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity that appeal to mature listeners as well. This collection of eighteen tales includes The Emperor's New Clothes, The Princess and t…

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The mother of five, Anne never has a dull moment in her home, and, now with a new baby on the way and insufferable Aunt Mary Maria visiting-and wearing out her welcome-her life is full to bursting. Still, Mrs. Doctor can't think of any place she'd rather be than her own beloved Ingleside-that is, until the day she begins to worry that her adored Gilbert doesn't love her anymore. But how could that…

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In the fifth book in the series, Anne's own true love, Gilbert Blythe, is finally a doctor, and, in the sunshine of the old orchard among their dearest friends, they are about to speak their vows. Soon, the happy couple will be bound for a new life together in their own dream house on the misty purple shores of Four Winds Harbor. But a new life means fresh problems to solve-and fresh surprises. As…

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Equality 7-2521 is a young man who yearns to understand “the Science of Things,” but he lives in a bleak, dystopian future where independent thought is a crime and where science and technology have regressed to primitive levels. All expressions of individualism have been suppressed in his world: personal possessions are nonexistent, individual preferences are condemned as sinful, and romantic love…

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In Appley Dapply's Nursery Rhymes, Beatrix Potter's delightful original nursery rhymes are accompanied by the lifelike illustrations of animals that made books like The Tale of Peter Rabbit and The Story of Miss Moppet so critically and commercially successful. The twentieth of Beatrix Potter's 22 charmingly illustrated tales of animals in amusing situations, Appley Dapply's Nursery Rhymes has del…

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In the first of an ongoing series of diverse and wide-ranging collections, Radio Archives brings you a panorama of what radio was like in its prime—offering comedy, drama, quiz and audience participation shows, and musical entertainment. There’s plenty of star power to enjoy, with appearances by Bob Cummings, Rosalind Russell, Cary Grant, Ronald Colman, Rise Stevens, and Ed Wynn, as well as a host…

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In the second of an ongoing series of diverse and wide-ranging collections, Radio Archives brings you a panorama of what radio was like in its prime. There’s plenty of star power to enjoy, with appearances by George Raft, Ginger Rogers, Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, Margaret O’Brien, Robert Young, and Joan Fontaine, and Preston Foster, as well as a host of radio’s legendary supporting actors, in…

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In this ongoing series of diverse and wide-ranging collections, Radio Archives brings you a panorama of what radio was like in its prime. There’s plenty of star power to enjoy, with appearances by Ray Milland, Jane Wyman, Robert Montgomery, Richard Widmark, Joe DeSantis, Bing Crosby, Barbara Luddy, Olan Soule, Dinah Shore, and Phil Harris, as well as a host of radio’s legendary supporting actors J…

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In Jules Verne's Around the World in 80 Days, Phileas Fogg, a solitary British gentleman of the Victorian era wagers that he can circumnavigate the globe in under 80 days. With his french manservant, Passepartout, Fogg embarks on a great adventure taking him through Egypt, India, the South Pacific, San Francisco and the Great Plains of the United States. But will he succeed and collect on his bets…

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Ingersoll Lockwood invented the fictional character Baron Trump in 1890 for a two-part sci-fi/fantasy series about a privileged boy who undertakes a sequence of fantastic voyages. The style of the Baron Trump series-a mix of fantasy and young-reader-oriented science fiction-anticipated and may have influenced L. Frank Baum's Oz series. The second in that series, Baron Trump's Marvellous Undergroun…

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In Manhattan, an elderly lawyer's business is growing. Having two scriveners in his employ, the lawyer advertises for a third to meet demand. Enter Bartleby, a glum albeit quality scrivener. However, the lawyer quickly discovers that something is off with his new employee. When asked to perform any duties outside of copywriting, Bartleby responds with a canned 'I would prefer not to.' Soon Bartleb…

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Beauty and the Beast is a traditional fairy tale in which an ugly beast must earn the true love of a beautiful girl to free him from the spell of an evil fairy. The first published version was written by French author Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve in the middle 18th century. It was a novel-length story intended for adult readers and addressing the issues of the marriage system of the day…

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In Becky's Christmas Dream, a poor working girl is left alone at Christmas time. Wishing for companionship and love, she is spoken to by an old gray cat, who reveals to her a simple truth about being loved.

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They railroaded Sam Parker off to prison for a crime he didn't commit. Now he's out of jail looking for answers from the people who framed him. This won't be pretty. They should have killed him when they had the chance.

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Captain Delano is approached on the open sea by a battered-looking ship lead by Captain Benito Cereno. Cereno, always accompanied by his personal slave Babo, explains that his crew was transporting a group of slaves from Africa when their ship was caught and damaged in severe weather. He is polite but always timid, and requests supplies for his ships remaining journey. Captain Delano agrees to hel…

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In this epic poem, Beowulf, a hero of the Geats, comes to the aid of the king of the Danes whose great hall is plagued by the monster Grendel. Beowulf kills Grendel bare-handed and goes on to kill Grendel's mother with a giant’s sword that he recovers from her lair. Later, as king of the Geats, Beowulf confronts a dragon that terrorizes his kingdom. J.R.R. Tolkien said of Beowulf that it is in fac…

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In Bertie's Box, a family sits around the table putting the finishing touches on their Christmas present wrapping. A letter arrives from a poor widow asking for assistance in providing a Christmas present for her two children. Overhearing this, young Bertie sets about packing up some of his toys to send to the unfortunate mother.

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Bertie Ross has a few more deliveries to make for Sampson's store before the New Years' holiday. After a delivery at the Forbes' house, Dr. Forbes' daughters invite cold-looking Bertie in to get warm and ask why he isn't wearing mittens. Explaining that he lent them to his sickly brother William John, the sisters hatch a plan to provide a proper New Year's celebration with the Ross brothers and pr…

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'The Big Show' presented a weekly mixture of comedy, drama and music from such guest stars as Jimmy Durante, Ethel Merman, Danny Thomas, Groucho Marx, Fanny Brice, Bob Hope, Eddie Cantor, Rudy Vallee, Judy Garland and Fred Allen - the latter graduating to semi-regular/contributing writer status. In fact, each program found the guests introducing themselves by name; the introductions completed with…

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'The Big Show' presented a weekly mixture of comedy, drama and music from such guest stars as Jimmy Durante, Ethel Merman, Danny Thomas, Groucho Marx, Fanny Brice, Bob Hope, Eddie Cantor, Rudy Vallee, Judy Garland and Fred Allen - the latter graduating to semi-regular/contributing writer status. In fact, each program found the guests introducing themselves by name; the introductions completed with…

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'The Big Show' presented a weekly mixture of comedy, drama and music from such guest stars as Jimmy Durante, Ethel Merman, Danny Thomas, Groucho Marx, Fanny Brice, Bob Hope, Eddie Cantor, Rudy Vallee, Judy Garland and Fred Allen - the latter graduating to semi-regular/contributing writer status. In fact, each program found the guests introducing themselves by name; the introductions completed with…

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'The Big Show' presented a weekly mixture of comedy, drama and music from such guest stars as Jimmy Durante, Ethel Merman, Danny Thomas, Groucho Marx, Fanny Brice, Bob Hope, Eddie Cantor, Rudy Vallee, Judy Garland and Fred Allen - the latter graduating to semi-regular/contributing writer status. In fact, each program found the guests introducing themselves by name; the introductions completed with…

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'The Big Show' presented a weekly mixture of comedy, drama and music from such guest stars as Jimmy Durante, Ethel Merman, Danny Thomas, Groucho Marx, Fanny Brice, Bob Hope, Eddie Cantor, Rudy Vallee, Judy Garland and Fred Allen - the latter graduating to semi-regular/contributing writer status. In fact, each program found the guests introducing themselves by name; the introductions completed with…

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In 1797, young Billy Budd is impressed into naval service. It is a perilous time for a British Royal Navy still reeling from mutinies and marauding French ships. When Billy is forcibly transferred to HMS Bellipotent, he evokes the wrath of John Claggart, the ship's Master-at-arms. Claggart falsely accuses Billy of conspiracy to mutiny, a charge that will have a profound effect on the fates of both…

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Billy Budd: Booktrack Edition adds an immersive musical soundtrack to your audiobook listening experience! In 1797, young Billy Budd is impressed into naval service. It is a perilous time for a British Royal Navy still reeling from mutinies and marauding French ships. When Billy is forcibly transferred to HMS Bellipotent, he evokes the wrath of John Claggart, the ship's Master-at-arms. Claggart fa…

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The series was a star vehicle for Dinah Shore, the Tennessee-born pop vocalist who'd climbed steadily up the ladder since her network debut in the late 1930s. Shore blended a jazz-conscious approach to the pop hits of the day with a breezy, easy-to-take microphone personality that made her a sensation on radio and records -- and her sense for comedy, honed by an early apprenticeship with Eddie Can…

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Black Beauty is a novel by English author Anna Sewell published in 1877. The story is told in the first person and is a fictional autobiographical memoir told from the perspective of a horse named Black Beauty. The story follow this horses life, from his young days on an English farm with his mother, to the more dreadful years of pulling cabs in London, and ending with his happy retirement in the…

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“Enemy to those who make him an enemy...Friend to those who have no friend!” That’s Boston Blackie, safecracker turned crime fighter and a long-running favorite with fans of straight-ahead detective fiction. Beginning in 1945, Broadway actor Richard Kollmar starred in a series of 220 syndicated episodes of this popular series, costarring Maurice Tarplin as Inspector Faraday and Jan Minor as girlfr…

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Broadway leading man Richard Kollmar initially seemed an odd choice to star as safecracker turned crime fighter Boston Blackie. But he soon made the role of the “enemy to those who make him an enemy, friend to those who have no friend” his own with a breezy portrayal that made the series a long-running favorite. Beginning in 1945, Kollmar starred in a series of 220 episodes of this popular series,…

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“Enemy to those who make him an enemy...Friend to those who have no friend!” That’s Boston Blackie, safecracker turned crime fighter and a long-running favorite with fans of straight-ahead detective fiction. Beginning in 1945, Broadway actor Richard Kollmar starred in a series of 220 syndicated episodes of this popular series, costarring Maurice Tarplin as Inspector Faraday and Jan Minor as girlfr…

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Broadway leading man Richard Kollmar initially seemed an odd choice to star as safecracker turned crime fighter Boston Blackie. But he soon made the role of the “enemy to those who make him an enemy, friend to those who have no friend” his own with a breezy portrayal that made the series a long-running favorite. Beginning in 1945, Kollmar starred in a series of 220 episodes of this popular series,…

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“Adventure wanted! Will go anywhere, do anything! Write Box Thirteen, Star-Times.” In 1948, motion-picture actor Alan Ladd teamed up with an old business associate named Bernie Joslin and created Mayfair Productions, a radio syndication company. In Box Thirteen, Ladd played the role of former reporter turned novelist, Dan Holiday. Dan never knows what adventure awaits him when he collects his mail…

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In 1948, motion-picture actor Alan Ladd teamed up with an old business associate named Bernie Joslin and created Mayfair Productions, a radio syndication company. In Box Thirteen, Ladd played the role of former reporter turned novelist, Dan Holiday. Dan never knows what adventure awaits him when he collects his mail from Box Thirteen at the Star-Times, which is always jammed with many potential ad…

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”Adventure Wanted. Will Go Anywhere, Do Anything. Box Thirteen.” More than just the show’s title, ‘Box Thirteen’ was an address for action and two fisted adventure. Dan Holiday, played to tough guy perfection by movie star Alan Ladd, was a newspaper reporter turned mystery writer with a unique approach to obtaining new material for his stories. Using an ad placed in the paper he works for, Holiday…

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”Adventure Wanted. Will Go Anywhere, Do Anything. Box Thirteen.” More than just the show’s title, ‘Box Thirteen’ was an address for action and two fisted adventure. Dan Holiday, played to tough guy perfection by movie star Alan Ladd, was a newspaper reporter turned mystery writer with a unique approach to obtaining new material for his stories. Using an ad placed in the paper he works for, Holiday…

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Dan Holiday, risk taking reporter turned author, is back! Played to tough guy perfection by movie star Alan Ladd, Holiday continues to find mystery and mayhem around every corner thanks to his unique approach to obtaining new material for his stories. Using an ad placed in the paper he works for, Holiday answers each response, either offering help to those in trouble or finding out someone wants h…

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”Adventure wanted. Will go anyplace, do anything. Box Thirteen.” These words sent Dan Holiday, reporter turned author, into mystery and action for fifty-two episodes of ‘Box Thirteen’, a stand out radio program produced in 1948-49. Mayfair Productions, Ladd’s own radio syndication company, produced the program, one of the best of its era. This final Volume of the classic well-produced show contain…

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Volume 1 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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Volume 2 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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Volume 3 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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Volume 4 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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Volume 5 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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Volume 6 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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Volume 7 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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Volume 8 in Calling All Cars, the classic radio show! “Crime does not pay...” -- four words that quickly sum up “Calling All Cars,” a popular crime drama heard from 1933 to 1939. One of radio’s earliest and most durable police procedural shows, the series’ stark and gritty realism is strongly reminiscent of Warner Brothers gangster films of the 1930s - particularly with the presence of real-life L…

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One of the finest satires ever written, this lively tale follows the absurdly melodramatic adventures of the youthful Candide, who is forced into the army, flogged, shipwrecked, betrayed, robbed, separated from his beloved Cunégonde, and tortured by the Inquisition. As Candide witnesses calamity, upon calamity, he becomes disillusioned and discovers that all is not always for the best. Candide is…

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First published in 1923, Jean Toomer's Cane is an innovative literary work powerfully evoking black life in the South. Rich in imagery, Toomer's impressionistic, sometimes surrealistic sketches of Southern rural and urban life are permeated by visions of smoke, sugarcane, dusk, and fire; the northern world is pictured as a harsher reality of asphalt streets. This iconic work of American literature…

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Captain Future…the Ace of Space! Born and raised on the moon, Curtis Newton survived the murder of his scientist parents to become the protector of the galaxy known as Captain Future. With his Futuremen - Grag the giant robot, Otho, the shape-shifting android and Simon Wright, the Living Brain - he patrols the solar system in the fastest space ship ever constructed, the Comet, pursuing human monst…

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Blasting his way through the Underworld comes a new kind of crime-buster - Cary Adair, alias Captain Satan! A modern Robin Hood who steals from the crooked kingpins of crime, Adair and his Satan's Crew fight crime on its own bloody terms: Blow for blow and bullet for bullet! Chapters: #1 Fifty Thousand Witnesses #2 The Mark of Satan #3 The Ambassadors from Hell #4 Satan's Sweepstakes #5 Danger Tra…

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In Captain Zero's first case, City of Deadly Sleep, he investigates a series of small-town murders with ties to the gambling racket. Venturing out by dark, the courageous captain swiftly becomes embroiled in a turf war between rival gangs. As the Underworld comes to grips with this mysterious new crime-fighter, Captain Zero struggles to keep his life and his secret identity intact while dodging cr…

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Newspaperman Lee Allyn never wanted to become a crime fighter, but when a strange accident caused him to turn invisible every night at midnight, he decided Fate had tapped him on his transparent shoulder. So Lee became Captain Zero. No big-city guy, he battles small-town crime wherever he finds it. Or when it finds him! How can Captain Zero defeat the murderous agents of the hidden mastermind know…

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Volume 1 in the Casey Crime Photographer series! This lighthearted crime drama spotlights witty dialogue, fanciful characters, and the congenial atmosphere that comes from setting much of the show’s action against the backdrop of a popular watering hole. The plots are basic - Casey snaps photos for the Morning Express and finds himself playing amateur sleuth by getting involved in the stories he c…

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Volume 2 in the Casey Crime Photographer series! This lighthearted crime drama spotlights witty dialogue, fanciful characters, and the congenial atmosphere that comes from setting much of the show’s action against the backdrop of a popular watering hole. The plots are basic - Casey snaps photos for the Morning Express and finds himself playing amateur sleuth by getting involved in the stories he c…

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Volume 3 in the Casey Crime Photographer series! This lighthearted crime drama spotlights witty dialogue, fanciful characters, and the congenial atmosphere that comes from setting much of the show’s action against the backdrop of a popular watering hole. The plots are basic - Casey snaps photos for the Morning Express and finds himself playing amateur sleuth by getting involved in the stories he c…

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The Age of Classic Radio was a time of innovation and experimentation in radio drama. A direct descendant of The Columbia Workshop, The CBS Radio Workshop not only continued to push boundaries in terms of utilizing story, music, voice and more in exciting, modern ways, it broke new ground in radio drama. From having author Aldous Huxley narrate the adaptation of his ‘Brave New World’ for the show’…

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The popular CBS Radio Workshop series is back with Volume 2! This seven hour set contains fourteen radio dramas, including children’s author, lyricist and playwright Edward Eager’s “The Toledo War”; an adaptation of the best-selling “The Little Prince”, Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s most famous work which was autobiographical; John Cheever’s “The Enormous Radio”, which allows a family to hear what go…

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Volume 3 of the CBS Radio Workshop includes “Subways are for Sleeping”, an adaptation of the novel by Edmund Love, who actually slept on the subways in the Fifties; “An Analysis of Satire” by Stan Freberg, best known today for his voice actor work with Warner Brothers animation; “A Pride of Carrots, or Venus Well Served”, by Robert Nathan, best known for films made from his novels (The Bishop’s Wi…

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Volume 4 of CBS Radio Workshop includes “All Is Bright”, a history of the famous Christmas song; “1489 Words”, based on a text piece by Thomas Wolfe and adapted by Jerry Goldsmith; a two-part adaptation of Frederick Pohl and Cyril M. Cornbluth’s The Space Merchants; Archibald MacLeish’s “Air Raid”, the series’ only re-broadcast, which had first been written for the 1938 Columbia Workshop; Henry Fr…

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Volume 5 of CBS Radio Workshop includes “Epitaphs”, from Edgar Lee Master’s Spoon River Anthology; Norman Dello Joio’s “Meditations On Ecclesiastes”), which won the 1957 Pulitzer Prize for music, conducted on the program by Alfredo Antonini; James Thurber’s “You Could Look It Up”; Robert Heinlein co-adapted his short story “The Green Hills of Earth; Edgar Allan Poe’s “Never Bet the Devil Your Head…

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In Cecily Parsley's Nursery Rhymes, Beatrix Potter's delightful and lifelike illustrations of animals accompany well-known nursery rhymes such as Goosey Goosey Gander, This Little Piggy and Three Blind Mice, themselves rewritten to refer to Potter's own recurring characters. Inspired by Potter's own childhood favorite illustrator Randolph Caldecott, who often depicted nursery rhymes with illustrat…

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Tom Collins played the lead role of American-born Frank Chandler, who had learned occult secrets from a yogi in India. Known as Chandu, he possessed several supernatural skills, including astral projection, teleportation and the ability to create illusions. Chandu's goal was to 'go forth with his youth and strength to conquer the evil that threatens mankind'. 'Time and space are only an illusion'…

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Tom Collins played the lead role of American-born Frank Chandler, who had learned occult secrets from a yogi in India. Known as Chandu, he possessed several supernatural skills, including astral projection, teleportation and the ability to create illusions. Chandu's goal was to 'go forth with his youth and strength to conquer the evil that threatens mankind'. 'Time and space are only an illusion'…

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Originally published in the 1876 Christmas edition of The Graphic, Christmas at Thompson Hall is a Victorian tale concerning the proper Mr. and Mrs. Brown and their journey from southern France to Thompson Hall to celebrate Christmas with their relatives-a trip that becomes a comedy of errors once Mr. Brown's throat condition, a malady that almost prevented the trip entirely, worsens. This recordi…

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This Christmas tale set in Colonial New England was originally published in the 1895 collection A Budget of Christmas Tales by Charles Dickens and Others. The short story takes place in a fictionalized version of Litchfield, Connecticut, the town where Stowe grew up, which is also the setting of her novel Poganuc People: Their Loves and Lives. This version of Christmas in Poganuc was recorded as p…

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Volume 1 of Chuck-Wagon Jamboree! To western fans, he will always be best known as Festus Haggen, the cantankerous sidekick of Sheriff Matt Dillon on the television series “Gunsmoke.” But even die-hard fans of Dodge City may not realize that, in the years just after World War II, actor Ken Curtis was a singing cowboy -- the star of his own western movie series and a musical radio favorite to boot.…

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Volume 2 of Chuck-Wagon Jamboree! To western fans, he will always be best known as Festus Haggen, the cantankerous sidekick of Sheriff Matt Dillon on the television series “Gunsmoke.” But even die-hard fans of Dodge City may not realize that, in the years just after World War II, actor Ken Curtis was a singing cowboy -- the star of his own western movie series and a musical radio favorite to boot.…

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By the time Cisco arrived at the microphone, he had been greatly sanitized to make him acceptable kiddie fare and had picked up the obligatory humorous ethnic sidekick -- Pancho, lifted without acknowledgement from Miguel Cervantes' 'Sancho Panza' character in 'DonQuixote'. Thus modified, 'The Cisco Kid' became a favorite with western and adventure fans during the 1940s. Dubbed 'The Robin Hood of…

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By the time Cisco arrived at the microphone, he had been greatly sanitized to make him acceptable kiddie fare and had picked up the obligatory humorous ethnic sidekick -- Pancho, lifted without acknowledgement from Miguel Cervantes' 'Sancho Panza' character in 'DonQuixote'. Thus modified, 'The Cisco Kid' became a favorite with western and adventure fans during the 1940s. Dubbed 'The Robin Hood of…

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By the time Cisco arrived at the microphone, he had been greatly sanitized to make him acceptable kiddie fare and had picked up the obligatory humorous ethnic sidekick -- Pancho, lifted without acknowledgement from Miguel Cervantes' 'Sancho Panza' character in 'DonQuixote'. Thus modified, 'The Cisco Kid' became a favorite with western and adventure fans during the 1940s. Dubbed 'The Robin Hood of…

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By the time Cisco arrived at the microphone, he had been greatly sanitized to make him acceptable kiddie fare and had picked up the obligatory humorous ethnic sidekick -- Pancho, lifted without acknowledgement from Miguel Cervantes' 'Sancho Panza' character in 'DonQuixote'. Thus modified, 'The Cisco Kid' became a favorite with western and adventure fans during the 1940s. Dubbed 'The Robin Hood of…

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Catch the holiday spirit with this magical collection of beloved Christmas tales. Christmas favorites from Mark Twain, O. Henry, Willa Cather, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Bret Harte and others are lovingly recorded and presented here in one enchanting volume.

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Volume 1 of the Claudia series! Though most daytime soap operas emphasized struggle and strife, “Claudia,” based on the stories by Rose Franken, told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young and very much in love, they simply faced the challenges of any new marriage - finding an apartment, getting used to each other’s quirks, and learning to live…

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In 1947, a show that broke the mold of what a soap opera was and still stands out as a unique example of that genre hit the airwaves. And this new take on soap operas had a name. “Claudia”. The very elements that made “Claudia” different from other soap operas quickly became its strengths. People came back to “Claudia” for the interesting, fully developed characters. The title character and her hu…

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Although viewed as a soap opera from Radio’s Golden Age, Claudia actually proves to be more than that. With very few of the “tune in tomorrow” hooks that most soaps used to lure listeners back the next day, people returning to Claudia instead came back for the interesting, fully developed characters, the light-hearted banter between them, and the familiarity of their day-to-day situations. Rather…

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Many shows from the classic age of Radio drama survive only as a handful of episodes or in some cases as pieces of episodes. “Claudia”, however, exists today in its entirety and is now being presented at the highest restored audio quality possible in multiple volumes by Radio Archives. Claudia, Volume 12 continues the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life…

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Since the inception of the soap opera on radio, various things have been part and parcel of that genre; melodrama, scandal and rumor, and enough deceit to fill a bathtub. In 1947, however, a new soap opera debuted, Claudia. This program, its entire run still in existence today, is a comedy/drama that was far different than the three-handkerchief weepers that occupied most of the daytime radio sche…

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Engaging characters, plots that at times incite laughter and tears, and ups and downs that average listeners faced delivered in fifteen-minute punches every day. This was and is Claudia. Heard today, Claudia, remains wonderful entertainment, notable for both its light-hearted tone and the believable interplay between its characters. As she presents in these last episodes, Claudia has become a uniq…

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Volume 2 of the Claudia series! Though most daytime soap operas emphasized struggle and strife, “Claudia,” based on the stories by Rose Franken, told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young and very much in love, they simply faced the challenges of any new marriage - finding an apartment, getting used to each other’s quirks, and learning to live…

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Volume 3 of the Claudia series! Though most daytime soap operas emphasized struggle and strife, “Claudia,” based on the stories by Rose Franken, told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young and very much in love, they simply faced the challenges of any new marriage - finding an apartment, getting used to each other’s quirks, and learning to live…

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Volume 4 of the Claudia series! Though most daytime soap operas emphasized struggle and strife, “Claudia,” based on the stories by Rose Franken, told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young and very much in love, they simply faced the challenges of any new marriage - finding an apartment, getting used to each other’s quirks, and learning to live…

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Volume 5 of the Claudia series! Though most daytime soap operas emphasized struggle and strife, “Claudia,” based on the stories by Rose Franken, told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young and very much in love, they simply faced the challenges of any new marriage - finding an apartment, getting used to each other’s quirks, and learning to live…

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Volume 6 of the Claudia series! Though most daytime soap operas emphasized struggle and strife, “Claudia,” based on the stories by Rose Franken, told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young and very much in love, they simply faced the challenges of any new marriage - finding an apartment, getting used to each other’s quirks, and learning to live…

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“Claudia” was a soap opera far different than its strife-ridden forbears. Listeners tuned in day after day for the interesting, fully developed characters, the light-hearted banter between them, and the familiarity of their day-to-day situations. This soap opera, is “Claudia,” the ongoing tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young, enthusiastic, and ver…

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In 1947, a new soap opera debuted in syndication - a drama that was far different than the storm-and-strife ridden weepers that occupied most of the daytime radio schedule. “Claudia” told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young, enthusiastic, and very much in love, they weren’t suffering from any medical maladies, suspicions of infidelity, or dea…

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Many works from the Golden Age of Radio had their origins in other mediums. A best selling book, a movie, a hit Broadway play. Some even went on to have their time in the spotlight on TV. One show to rise out or grow into all of these mediums and become a part of radio history as well was a stand out unique soap opera called “Claudia.” Heard today, “Claudia” remains wonderful entertainment, notabl…

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Although many programs can be described as innovative and cutting edge, one classic from radio’s golden era was truly an experiment in what could be done with the medium from its first episode. The concept of Columbia Workshop, conceived by Irving Reis, was to try new innovations on radio. The program focused on both the cutting edge work of sound techs and producers as well as the ability of perf…

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An often-overlooked aspect of old time radio, overshadowed frequently by the stories told on the shows and the stars that performed them, was the fact that a crucial part of the medium was sound. Columbia Workshop not only paid attention to sound, but advanced how it was used on other programs then and now. Believing that ‘production, not the play, was the thing’, Irving Reis, the man behind the s…

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Conceived originally as a program to push the boundaries of network radio, Columbia Workshop became a voice for writers and actors, a voice that America listened to. Columbia Workshop found its true stride in 1937 both as an innovator in radio production, but also in the quality of work it was producing. Columbia Workshop focused on turning quality scripts into quality episodes. Both the extremely…

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The Comic Weekly Man combined two pastimes important to American families, Radio and Comic strips. The Comic Weekly Man brought comic strip favorites to life in a way most strips had never been heard. One amazing aspect of this program is just how many voices were heard each week. The Comic Weekly Man, voiced by veteran radio actor Lon Clark, voiced all the male parts while Little Miss Honey, a yo…

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The Comic Weekly Man combined two pastimes important to American families, Radio and Comic strips. The Comic Weekly Man brought comic strip favorites to life in a way most strips had never been heard. One amazing aspect of this program is just how many voices were heard each week. The Comic Weekly Man, voiced by veteran radio actor Lon Clark, voiced all the male parts while Little Miss Honey, a yo…

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The Comic Weekly Man combined two pastimes important to American families, Radio and Comic strips. The Comic Weekly Man brought comic strip favorites to life in a way most strips had never been heard. One amazing aspect of this program is just how many voices were heard each week. The Comic Weekly Man, voiced by veteran radio actor Lon Clark, voiced all the male parts while Little Miss Honey, a yo…

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In the mid-1930s. “The Eno Crime Club” was one of radio’s most popular anthology series. Ten years later, in 1946, “Crime Club” made a return appearance on the Mutual Radio Network, hosted by a character dubbed “The Librarian” (played by Barry Thompson and Raymond Edward Johnson) who told tales of mystery and adventure, with detective stories taking a prominent role. This version lasted only a sin…

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Cursed Be the Child is a chilling experience. The story is filled with dark, most horrifying magic. This is a tale of ghostly possession and terrible tragedy. Overwhelmed by the evil spirit of Lisette, Missy plots horrible vengeance against her parents, and others. Each character is attacked by Lisette, and each one of them fights in the battle to defeat her. Gypsy magic plays a large part in the…

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“Curtain Time” was a dramatic anthology series that gave listening audiences the experience of attending a live theatrical performance. Each week the series’ genial host would arrive at the theater to attend the opening night performance of a first-run play - generally a romantic comedy - and be greeted by an usher who would escort him to his seat. Once comfortable, the host would chat briefly abo…

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The Grey Gang was the most vicious criminal kidnapping ring in the nation. Ordinary police could not capture them. Their victims mounted. So J. Edgar Hoover assigned his top G-Man to track them down. Special Agent Dan Fowler was the right man for the job. Tough as nails, cool under fire, he was as relentless as his enemies were cruel. Fowler swore an oath to crush these murderous specialists in th…

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Volume 1 of the Dangerous Assignment radio program! A modern day soldier of fortune finds mystery and intrigue in lands strange and romantic on - Dangerous Assignment!” This ad copy for NBC’s globe-hopping adventure series captured the essence of the program perfectly. Steve Mitchell, played by Brian Donlevy in a two-fisted and pulpy style, is the sort of hero America looked for in entertainment i…

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Volume 2 of the Dangerous Assignment radio program! A modern day soldier of fortune finds mystery and intrigue in lands strange and romantic on - Dangerous Assignment!” This ad copy for NBC’s globe-hopping adventure series captured the essence of the program perfectly. Steve Mitchell, played by Brian Donlevy in a two-fisted and pulpy style, is the sort of hero America looked for in entertainment i…

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Tom Collins played the lead role of American-born Frank Chandler, who had learned occult secrets from a yogi in India. Known as Chandu, he possessed several supernatural skills, including astral projection, teleportation and the ability to create illusions. Chandu's goal was to 'go forth with his youth and strength to conquer the evil that threatens mankind'. 'Time and space are only an illusion'…

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Volume 4 of the Dangerous Assignment radio series! Yeah, danger is my assignment. I get sent to a lot of places I can’t even pronounce. They all spell the same thing, though. Trouble.” In this opening line heard on various episodes, Steve Mitchell, special agent for an unnamed agency protecting America from foreign threats, describes Dangerous Assignment perfectly. Focused on Mitchell’s adventures…

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Volume 5 of the Dangerous Assignment radio program! A modern day soldier of fortune finds mystery and intrigue in lands strange and romantic on - Dangerous Assignment!” This ad copy for NBC’s globe-hopping adventure series captured the essence of the program perfectly. Steve Mitchell, played by Brian Donlevy in a two-fisted and pulpy style, is the sort of hero America looked for in entertainment i…

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It was the largest, most ambitious, and most successful military operation ever attempted -- and radio was there to cover it. D-Day, the invasion of Normandy. It was the turning point of the war in Europe, the beginning of the end for the Axis as the Allies started their drive towards Germany. It was a momentous event that would change not only the course of World War II, but the history of the wo…

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It was the largest, most ambitious, and most successful military operation ever attempted -- and radio was there to cover it. D-Day, the invasion of Normandy. It was the turning point of the war in Europe, the beginning of the end for the Axis as the Allies started their drive towards Germany. It was a momentous event that would change not only the course of World War II, but the history of the wo…

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It begins when hardheaded mountain matriarch Granny Mustard decides she wants to live forever, but is killed before she can achieve her goal. Her slow-witted but equally hardheaded granddaughter Jenkie decides to pick up the ball and run with it. She takes Granny’s unperfected immortality moonshine recipe, a socially-inept friend named Bink, and dreams of fame and fortune to an abandoned trailer u…

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Who is Doc Harker? A courtly Kentucky colonel of the old school, Dr. Thaddeus Clay Harker traveled the back roads of America in a fire-engine red roadster and matching house trailer. Aided by his hulking assistant, Hercules Jones, and advance agent Brenda Sloan, Harker dispensed his patented Chickasha Remedies to the common folk - and cool, calculated justice to the lawless! For Doc Harker was the…

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During the Great Depression, there was one premier periodical of terror and horror - Dime Mystery Magazine! Within a year, it was spawning imitators and companion titles such as Terror Tales and Horror Stories. Here are some of Dime Mystery's strongest offerings - three stories of strange suspense and supernatural terror, penned by a trio of dark disciples of Weird Menace, each tale weirder and wi…

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An ultra-secret State Department mission code-named Moonwinx propels Doc Savage from the concrete canyons of Manhattan to the icy black waters of the Arctic Sea, then deep into the frozen heart of Cold War Russia in a daring Flight into Fear. Targeted for assassination by the Kremlin and fated for a confrontation with a nemesis more violent and vicious than any he has faced before, the Man of Bron…

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Doc Savage, the legendary superman scientist known as the Man of Bronze, captivated adventure readers from 1933 to 1949 in his own pulp magazine, and again in the 1960s through the 1980s in a million-selling Bantam Books paperback series. In 1990, Will Murray, heir apparent to Doc Savage originator Lester Dent, revived the famous Street & Smith superhero in a new series of exploits based on Dent’s…

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Two of the greatest legends of the 1930s were Doc Savage, the Man of Bronze, and King Kong, the Eighth Wonder of the World. Both made their memorable debuts within weeks of one another early in 1933. It is rare that legends ever meet. For when legends do meet, they often clash, and the consequences can be catastrophic. Skull Island tells the previously untold tale of just such a momentous encounte…

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Out of a clear, sun-heated sky, they materialized, clouds such as man had never seen before. Red as blood, tumultuous, boiling, coming from none knew where and carrying an awful and mysterious death. These were the Copper Clouds. Doc Savage sends out an urgent message to his men, calling for them to assemble Los Angeles. For his adventurous cousin, Patricia Savage, has gone missing, reportedly a v…

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He called himself X Man—X for unknown. Found dressed in a Roman toga, wandering the ruins of an old fort from Caesar’s day, X Man was thrown into a madhouse, his origins and real name impossible to discover. What is the strange connection between this supposed madman, a multi-headed sea creature discovered swimming in a Scottish loch, and a pair of rogues willing to kill to control the secret of t…

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The inexplicable disappearance of sea life off the Massachusetts coast signals a strange new threat that comes to the attention of Doc Savage, the premier scientist of his day. What weird power is scaring schools of fish from their usual habitats? Who is behind this new global menace? What does it portend for mankind? The eerie trail leads across the Pacific to faraway Occupied Japan, where Doc be…

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Doc Savage, the legendary superman scientist known as the Man of Bronze, captivated adventure readers from 1933 to 1949 in his own pulp magazine, and again in the 1960s through the 80s in a million-selling Bantam Books paperback series. In 1990, Will Murray, heir apparent to Doc Savage originator Lester Dent, revived the famous Street & Smith superhero in a new series of exploits based on Dent’s u…

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A visiting king vanishes from his moving limousine on the way to a White House dinner, astounding the world. The nation is baffled. Authorities are helpless. The political world reels. What happened to King Goz? Doc Savage is called to Washington, D.C. to unravel the enigma of the missing monarch. But the mystery only darkens when the royal sword turns up—impaled in the bodies of victims discovere…

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Doc Savage, the legendary superman scientist known as the Man of Bronze, captivated adventure readers from 1933 to 1949 in his own pulp magazine, and again in the 1960s through the 1980s in a million-selling Bantam Books paperback series. In 1990, Will Murray, heir apparent to Doc Savage originator Lester Dent, revived the famous Street & Smith superhero in a new series of exploits based on Dent’s…

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Who is Dr. Rance Mandarin? A wizard of science dedicated to hurling modern man back into the Stone Age! A twisted combination of Albert Einstein and Boris Karloff. The malevolent monster who calls himself Doctor Death! Master of the Black Arts, invoker of evil elementals and generalissimo of an army of marauding Zombies, Doctor Death has decreed that mankind must revert to a more primitive state-o…

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Doctor Death returns! The most maniacal member of Yale's Skull and Bones society, super scientist Rance Mandarin, is back with a new scheme to hurl mankind back to the Dark Ages, where he believes humanity belongs. Master of Zombies and malevolent elementals, Death seeks to raise the ultimate army of the Undead-mummies! Once more, Jimmy Holm, criminologist and occultist, musters the power of moder…

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Back for a third terrible try at conquering the world, Rance Mandarin - the malevolent Zombie master feared by all sane men as Doctor Death - has returned from the grave. Sworn to hurl civilization back into a new Dark Age, Doctor Death has conceived a weird new scheme to achieve his diabolical ends. When the body of the Vice President of the United States arrives at the White House with a note de…

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An earthquake sends Dorothy and her California friends, Zeb, Jim, and Eureka, tumbling down a crack and deep beneath the earth. There she runs into her old friend, the Wizard of Oz. Together with the Wizard and his troupe of piglets, Dorothy and friends travel through many fantastical lands, such as the Valley of Voe, where fruit has turned the entire population invisible. After a run-in with flyi…

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A frequently underrated and long-running family series, “Dr. Christian” comes across today more as a quiet anthology of small-town life than as a straight medical drama, bringing the people of the small town of River’s End to life thru the eyes of the kindly Dr. Paul Christian (Jean Hersholt, in the role for which he is best remembered) and his sensitive nurse, Judy Price (Rosemary DeCamp). The se…

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“The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” is considered one of the greatest tales of horror to date. When Australian producer George Edwards added in his production and vocal skills, a true radio serial classic was born. “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” retold Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man divided. George Edwards lent not only his production skills to Jekyll and Hyde, but shared his…

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The era of Classic Radio gave listeners one of the best adaptations of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man divided produced in Australia- Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The man behind Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was George Edwards and was just the right person to bring this dynamic tale of split personality to life. Well known as “The Man with a Thousand Voices,” Edwards could not only could mimi…

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Washington D.C. is under attack! All over the nation's capital, men are struck down-their bodies turned the color of cowardice-by a fatal force known as The Dragon's Shadow! Malevolent forces are on the move. Two men of indomitable wills are locked in a death struggle, with the fate of America at stake. State Department troubleshooter Michael Taile, the Man Who Never Slept, versus the shadowy head…

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A weird doom hovers over New York City. People are reduced to corpses of colored dust. Strange creeping Gray Men murder in service to the Invisible Emperor. Victims are found with their staring heads sewn on backwards! Nameless fear grips Manhattan. Once again, Dr. Yen Sin has invaded an American city! And once more, State Department investigator Michael Traile- known as the Man Who Never Slept-ta…

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San Francisco is the scene of the strangest series of murders ever recorded on American soil. All over the city, victims are discovered, inexplicably turned into shriveled mummies, their parchment-dry lips parted-desiccated throats singing an eerie song! When State Department troubleshooter Michael Traile witnesses a woman turn into a weirdly trilling cadaver before his very eyes, the Man Who Neve…

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Police procedurals go back long before Dragnet's 1949 premiere -- with an especially strong heritage in Los Angeles. Private Investigator Nick Harris presented dramatizations drawn from his own true-life case files as far back as the 1920s, and the Los Angeles Police Department itself collaborated closely with Don Lee Network producer William N. Robson for the long-running 1930's series 'Calling A…

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Dragnet is considered a classic program for several reasons. One of the best aspects of Dragnet and the reason for the show’s existence was its star Jack Webb and his role as Joe Friday. Webb made sure that Friday was a policeman that other policemen could relate to and that listeners enjoyed. Played almost to understated perfection, Friday walks listeners through every episode, unfurling the case…

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Police procedurals go back long before Dragnet's 1949 premiere -- with an especially strong heritage in Los Angeles. Private Investigator Nick Harris presented dramatizations drawn from his own true-life case files as far back as the 1920s, and the Los Angeles Police Department itself collaborated closely with Don Lee Network producer William N. Robson for the long-running 1930's series 'Calling A…

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Marking a sharp departure from radio’s hard-boiled gumshoes, the 1949 premier of Jack Webb’s “Dragnet” was a breath of fresh air. No exaggerated characterizations, no purple dialogue, just a dedicated law enforcement officer determined to do his job as completely and as thoroughly as possible. Lt. Joe Friday may have been just another workaday guy trudging thru his daily routine but, in Webb’s han…

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In a radio schedule packed with dangerous dames and gat-toting gumshoes, “Dragnet” was a strikingly different and provocative program that took an inside look at the everyday work of police officers. Deliberately understated and low-key, the series was created by and stars Jack Webb as Sergeant Joe Friday - an average cop who spends his days - and often his nights - working with his colleagues to…

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Although not the first to base its stories on real cases, Dragnet most assuredly was best in assuring that each program was as realistic as possible, from the first step heard to the last word spoken. Dragnet creator and star Jack Webb insisted that this show would be as true to life as possible. Dragnet portrayed each procedure followed by policemen accurately, but took this accuracy even further…

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Dragnet is considered a classic program for several reasons. One of the best aspects of Dragnet and the reason for the show’s existence was its star Jack Webb and his role as Joe Friday. Webb made sure that Friday was a policeman that other policemen could relate to and that listeners enjoyed. Played almost to understated perfection, Friday walks listeners through every episode, unfurling the case…

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Known for breaking new ground in radio and entertainment, Dragnet was truly a pioneering program in many ways. This was most evident in the actual stories told in each episode, some sentimental, some brutal, all as realistic as show creator Jack Webb could make them. This program was in every sense a true police procedural and dealt with crimes of all sorts. Never gratuitous in its portrayal, Drag…

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Dragnet is considered a classic program for several reasons. One of the best aspects of Dragnet and the reason for the show’s existence was its star Jack Webb and his role as Joe Friday. Webb made sure that Friday was a policeman that other policemen could relate to and that listeners enjoyed. Played almost to understated perfection, Friday walks listeners through every episode, unfurling the case…

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Dragnet is considered a classic program for several reasons. One of the best aspects of Dragnet and the reason for the show’s existence was its star Jack Webb and his role as Joe Friday. Webb made sure that Friday was a policeman that other policemen could relate to and that listeners enjoyed. Played almost to understated perfection, Friday walks listeners through every episode, unfurling the case…

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From out of the distant past-or is it the far future?-flies top fighter pilot, Dusty Ayres! America, you are next! As those words rang though the War Department room, officers gasped in horror. Fire-Eyes, emperor of the world, had invaded their secret council to hurl his challenge. And America knew only one answer-War Declared! Rising to that challenge is Air Force Captain Dusty Ayres, flying the…

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The President's son will be returned if you send us Captain Ayres in exchange. From the enemy camp came this message. And as Dusty answered, he knew he was starting on the greatest mission of the war, was going to play a lone hand against the Black Invaders, who sought to crush America beneath their barbarous wings! Once again, America's greatest war pilot is thrust into a sky duel with his arch-f…

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With high school over, Emily Starr is ready to find her destiny - but she's not quite ready to leave the safety of New Moon farm. She knows that she doesn't need New York City or some other exotic locale to help her become a famous writer, but as all of Emily's friends begin moving away to pursue their own aspirations, she wonders if she's made the right decision. After suffering through a devasta…

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Escape never received the lavish attention afforded to Suspense but, from July 7, 1947 to September 25, 1954, it managed to transcend its mostly network-sustained origins and provide top-quality entertainment. Occasionally a celebrity would appear in a leading role - Victor Mature, Edmond O'Brien, Vincent Price - but for the most part Escape relied on the tried-and-true veterans of 'Radio Row', ou…

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Escape never received the lavish attention afforded to Suspense but, from July 7, 1947 to September 25, 1954, it managed to transcend its mostly network-sustained origins and provide top-quality entertainment. Occasionally a celebrity would appear in a leading role - Victor Mature, Edmond O'Brien, Vincent Price - but for the most part Escape relied on the tried-and-true veterans of 'Radio Row', ou…

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Burdened by poverty and spiritually dulled by a loveless marriage to Zeena, his older and ailing wife, Ethan Frome is emotionally stirred by the arrival of their youthful cousin, Mattie Silver, who becomes employed as household help. Mattie's presence not only brightens a gloomy house but also stirs long-dormant feelings in Ethan. However, their growing love for each other is discovered by the emb…

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The Family Doctor was a family drama. Cedarton is a typical small town in an unnamed state, where you knew your neighbors and you could leave your doors unlocked. Today the show is a reminder of simpler times, when old-fashioned moral values were in full bloom and the sense of community was strong. Adams is a kindly small town doctor who serves the citizens of Cedarton, tending their bodies as wel…

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Gabriel Oak is a shepherd struggling to get ahead when Bathsheba Everdene moves next door. Although he loves her, she sees him as a friend and rejects him for two other suitors. After she leaves town, she and Gabriel are reunited years later, once everything has changed. In this classic novel, Thomas Hardy depicts the English countryside as idyllic but also hard and unforgiving, much like the Vict…

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As created by actor Robert Young and writer Ed James, “Father Knows Best” began as a fairly typical situation comedy but, by the time the show was first aired in 1949, most of the clichés had been removed. What was left was a solid, well-written portrayal of typical middle-American family life, with a surprising emphasis on well-shaded characters, rather than outlandish situations, to bring out th…

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As created by actor Robert Young and writer Ed James, “Father Knows Best” began as a fairly typical situation comedy but, by the time the show was first aired in 1949, most of the clichés had been removed. What was left was a solid, well-written portrayal of typical middle-American family life, with a surprising emphasis on well-shaded characters, rather than outlandish situations, to bring out th…

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As created by actor Robert Young and writer Ed James, “Father Knows Best” began as a fairly typical situation comedy but, by the time the show was first aired in 1949, most of the clichés had been removed. What was left was a solid, well-written portrayal of typical middle-American family life, with a surprising emphasis on well-shaded characters, rather than outlandish situations, to bring out th…

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As created by actor Robert Young and writer Ed James, “Father Knows Best” began as a fairly typical situation comedy but, by the time the show was first aired in 1949, most of the clichés had been removed. What was left was a solid, well-written portrayal of typical middle-American family life, with a surprising emphasis on well-shaded characters, rather than outlandish situations, to bring out th…

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The 1950s was an interesting era in America and a prime example of radio reflecting this was Father Knows Best. This show was quite unique for the period, a solid, well-written portrayal of typical Midwestern family life with a surprising emphasis on well-shaded characters to bring out the humorous side of suburban life. Thanks to excellent writing and outstanding acting, these hilarious slices of…

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In the post-war years, America developed a new economic base with a new and ever-increasing standard of living, which, coupled with the baby boom, created suburbia. Originally not much different than similar situation comedies of the period, Father Knows Best rose above norm by removing most of the clichés before it went on air, and thanks to excellent writing and the outstanding acting talents of…

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After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

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After nearly eighteen years as a Tuesday night radio staple, Jim and Marian Jordan were considering retiring “Fibber McGee and Molly” to the happy memories of days past - but, in the fall of 1953, NBC had a better idea. Why not instead reconfigure the beloved radio classic into a five-a-week daytime/early evening show? The result was three more years of delightful entertainment from Wistful Vista’…

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For decades, the hilarious antics of “Fibber McGee and Molly” have been available for the enjoyment of classic radio fans - but until recently, their 1950s daytime series for NBC has been considered lost to the ages. Now Radio Archives has unearthed the original recordings for their long-lost fifteen minute series and has made them available in “Fibber McGee and Molly: The Lost Episodes”, a contin…

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Join Jim and Marion Jordan for a vacation in Wistful Vista in eighteen long-lost episodes of “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show”, just as originally aired in 1955 and 1956. Joined by such familiar neighbors as Doc Gamble (Arthur Q. Bryan), The Old Timer, and Wallace Wimple (Bill Thompson), these hilarious family comedies, unheard for well over fifty years, have been transferred directly from the ori…

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Join Jim and Marian Jordan, the real magic of ‘Fibber McGee and Molly The Lost Episodes’ once more with Volume 13! Like the McGees in many ways in their own lives, The Jordans brought a genuine small town folk charm to each episode every single night. Supported by a fantastic cast of characters and wonderful writers, Jim and Marian Jordan made ‘Fibber McGee and Molly’ an endearing radio classic. “…

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What makes classic radio comedy? The best comedy writing perhaps for any radio program in history. Memorable, lovable characters. The banter that people all across the country tuned in for every night. And two extremely strong lead characters. It’s not surprising, then, that “Fibber McGee and Molly” enjoyed one of the most successful runs in radio history, being heard on the air in one form or ano…

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What makes classic radio comedy? The best comedy writing perhaps for any radio program in history. Memorable, lovable characters. The banter that people all across the country tuned in for every night. And two extremely strong lead characters. It’s not surprising, then, that “Fibber McGee and Molly” enjoyed one of the most successful runs in radio history, being heard on the air in one form or ano…

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After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

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After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

Learn More

After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

Learn More

After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

Learn More

After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

Learn More

After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

Learn More

After nearly two decades of prime-time popularity, in the fall of 1953, “The Fibber McGee and Molly Show” was revamped into a five-day-a-week, quarter-hour program. For the next three years, Jim and Marian Jordan continued to generate mirth from their famous address at 79 Wistful Vista, joined by such long-time comedy foils as Bill Thompson (The Old Timer, Wallace Wimple) and Arthur Q. Bryan (Doc…

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Though radio audiences were dwindling, in 1953, something amazing happened to Jim and Marian Jordan. The team who had made “Fibber McGee and Molly” an institution found themselves reborn in a daily quarter-hour comedy series for NBC Radio. Still based in the town of Wistful Vista, this revamp of the weekly series found the McGee’s encountering a never-ending array of colorful and eccentric charact…

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Whether boasting about his influence in town, his prowess in the kitchen, his grace on the ice, or his savvy with a rod and reel, no man was ever more determined to stick to his guns -- and his story - than Fibber McGee! Head on over to Wistful Vista for a visit with the Old Timer, Wallace Wimple, Doc Gamble, and Mayor LaTrivia -- and of course Jim and Marian Jordan as your old friends Fibber McGe…

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Whether boasting about his influence in town, his prowess in the kitchen, his grace on the ice, or his savvy with a rod and reel, no man was ever more determined to stick to his guns -- and his story - than Fibber McGee! Head on over to Wistful Vista for a visit with the Old Timer, Wallace Wimple, Doc Gamble, and Mayor LaTrivia -- and of course Jim and Marian Jordan as your old friends Fibber McGe…

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Whether boasting about his influence in town, his prowess in the kitchen, his grace on the ice, or his savvy with a rod and reel, no man was ever more determined to stick to his guns -- and his story - than Fibber McGee! Head on over to Wistful Vista for a visit with the Old Timer, Wallace Wimple, Doc Gamble, and Mayor LaTrivia -- and of course Jim and Marian Jordan as your old friends Fibber McGe…

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Raymond Burr stars as the commanding officer of a rugged cavalry outpost in “Fort Laramie,” a subtle and realistic dramatic series created, written, and produced by many of the same people who made radio history with the groundbreaking adult western “Gunsmoke”. Producer Norman Macdonnell saw the series as “a monument to ordinary men who lived in extraordinary times”; their enemies “the rugged, unc…

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Raymond Burr stars as the commanding officer of a rugged cavalry outpost in “Fort Laramie,” a subtle and realistic dramatic series created, written, and produced by many of the same people who made radio history with the groundbreaking adult western “Gunsmoke”. Producer Norman Macdonnell saw the series as “a monument to ordinary men who lived in extraordinary times”; their enemies “the rugged, unc…

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“Frontier Town” features action star Jeff Chandler in a role far removed from his best-known radio characterization as Mr. Boynton, the goofy biology teacher/boyfriend of Eve Arden on “Our Miss Brooks”. Credited as “Tex” rather than “Jeff,” Chandler is heard here as Chad Remington, a tough but dedicated lawyer in the rough and tumble frontier town of Dos Rios, fighting for justice with the aid of…

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No one knew the identity of the mystery pilot called G-8. Not even his gallant wingmen, Bull Martin and Nippy Weston. But to the legions of the cruel German war machine, he was the scourge of World War I! Flying a Spad warplane marked only with his cryptic code-name, the invincible ace ranged the blood-soaked skies over No Man’s Land, hunting the worst war criminals the Kaiser had to offer. His or…

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Bizarre tentacle things are prowling the front. Animal, vegetable, nor insect, they somehow combine elements of all three! Yet these marauding giants also possess near-humanlike intelligence-for their unstoppable tentacles seek to snare and crush only allied warplanes. What are The Death monsters? Why do they fight for Germany? What fiendish brain controls them? These are the questions G-8 and his…

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They looked like ordinary clouds, the kind that parade across the sky every day. Yet their fleecy whiteness concealed a terrible threat to the Allied war effort. As American planes flew past, monster arms thrust out, titan fingers clutched at flashing winds. One by one, the dawn patrol was ground to a sickening, useless pulp. The High Command refused to believe these reports. But wise in the ways…

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One by one, the great Allied generals died or disappeared mysteriously. On the eve of the biggest drive of the war, the High Command was being decimated, their military secrets falling into the hands of the German enemy. Only G-8 saw the connection between these dastardly attacks and the strange war cripple who haunted the streets of Paris, creeping on his belly like a snake. Only the Master spy s…

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Out of the war-ravaged skies of France careens an uncanny new threat. German aces, shot down in flames only months before, are back with a vengeance-back from the dead! What can G-8 and his fighting wingmen, Bull Martin and Nippy Weston, do against this sinister Squadron of Corpses reanimated by Black Magic? Their flesh-ripping bullets have no effect on these disinterred pilots, and with each pass…

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Of all the characters introduced by the pulps, no one was more popular or more influential than The Shadow. No other character so captured the interest and imagination of the American public during the thirties and forties. From the radio to the pulps back to the radio The Shadow was the dominant fictional character of the time. But what exactly is the background of this mysterious fighter for law…

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Volume 1 of Gene Autry's Melody Ranch! Republic Pictures’ singing cowboy Gene Autry stars in “Melody Ranch,” offering a pleasant and tuneful opportunity to hear Gene and his musicians perform a wide range of musical favorites, as well as the banter between Gene, his fellow musicians, and sidekick Pat Buttram. Combining music, comedy, and dramatic sequences featuring Autry as the moral two-fisted h…

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Volume 2 of Gene Autry's Melody Ranch! Republic Pictures’ singing cowboy Gene Autry stars in “Melody Ranch,” offering a pleasant and tuneful opportunity to hear Gene and his musicians perform a wide range of musical favorites, as well as the banter between Gene, his fellow musicians, and sidekick Pat Buttram. Combining music, comedy, and dramatic sequences featuring Autry as the moral two-fisted h…

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Glinda and Dorothy travel to an obscure corner of Oz to prevent a war between the Skeezers and the Flatheads. When the Skeezers imprison them on a glass-covered island at the bottom of a lake, Glinda and Dorothy must call upon their magical friends to rescue them. The last of the original Oz books written by L. Frank Baum, this story was dedicated to his son, Robert.

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The Great Gildersleeve is a favorite of radio fans, with fine writing, engaging characters, and a brillant blend of comedy and drama that set a high water mark for classic sitatuation comedy. Set in the small town of Summerfield, Willard Waterman is featured as the local Water Commissioner, struggling to successfully raise his niece Marjorie (Marylee Robb) and his precocious nephew Leroy (Walter T…

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The Great Gildersleeve is a favorite of radio fans, with fine writing, engaging characters, and a brillant blend of comedy and drama that set a high water mark for classic sitatuation comedy. Set in the small town of Summerfield, Willard Waterman is featured as the local Water Commissioner, struggling to successfully raise his niece Marjorie (Marylee Robb) and his precocious nephew Leroy (Walter T…

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“Great Scenes from Great Plays” offered some of the finest performers of the 20th century in adaptations of some of the best plays ever to be presented. Hosted by veteran actor/producer Walter Hampden, the series drew upon the many stars then appearing in plays along with Great White Way. Despite attracting top names, however, the series did not succeed in gaining a sponsor and was cancelled after…

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Shipwrecked and cast adrift, Lemuel Gulliver wakes to find himself on Lilliput, an island inhabited by little people whose height makes their quarrels over fashion and fame seem ridiculous. His subsequent encounters with the crude giants of Brobdingnag, the philosophical Houyhnhnms, and the brutish Yahoos give him further insight into human behavior. Presented through Swift's satiric hall of disto…

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In Gwen's Adventure in the Snow, Gwen and her siblings set out on a winter evening's sleigh ride only to encounter bad weather. Taking shelter in their country house to wait out the snowstorm, the group builds a fire, makes a picnic from the house's reserves and shares stories to allay each other's fears.

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“Have Gun, Will Travel” stars John Dehner as Paladin a cultured and sophisticated gentleman with an eye for the ladies, a taste for gourmet food, wine, and cigars, and enough skill, nerve, and well-oiled artillery to make him a top-notch gunfighter. Headquartered at the fashionable Carleton Hotel in San Francisco, Paladin chooses to finance his luxurious lifestyle by being a combination go-between…

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“Have Gun, Will Travel” stars John Dehner as Paladin a cultured and sophisticated gentleman with an eye for the ladies, a taste for gourmet food, wine, and cigars, and enough skill, nerve, and well-oiled artillery to make him a top-notch gunfighter. Headquartered at the fashionable Carleton Hotel in San Francisco, Paladin chooses to finance his luxurious lifestyle by being a combination go-between…

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“Have Gun, Will Travel” stars John Dehner as Paladin a cultured and sophisticated gentleman with an eye for the ladies, a taste for gourmet food, wine, and cigars, and enough skill, nerve, and well-oiled artillery to make him a top-notch gunfighter. Headquartered at the fashionable Carleton Hotel in San Francisco, Paladin chooses to finance his luxurious lifestyle by being a combination go-between…

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“Have Gun, Will Travel” stars John Dehner as Paladin, a cultured and sophisticated gentleman with an eye for the ladies, a taste for gourmet food, wine, and cigars, and enough skill, nerve, and well-oiled artillery to make him a top-notch gunfighter. Headquartered at the fashionable Carleton Hotel in San Francisco, Paladin chooses to finance his luxurious lifestyle by being a combination go-betwee…

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Adapted from the CBS Television series, “Have Gun, Will Travel” stars John Dehner as Paladin, a white knight of the Old West. Equipped with brains, nerve, and a custom designed sidearm and derringer, Paladin finances his stylish and luxurious San Francisco lifestyle by serving as a defender, go-between, and hired gun for those in need - and, in the wild and wooly west of 1875, business is always g…

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Adapted from the CBS Television series, “Have Gun, Will Travel” stars John Dehner as Paladin, a white knight of the Old West. Equipped with brains, nerve, and a custom designed sidearm and derringer, Paladin finances his stylish and luxurious San Francisco lifestyle by serving as a defender, go-between, and hired gun for those in need - and, in the wild and wooly west of 1875, business is always g…

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Adapted from the CBS Television series, “Have Gun, Will Travel” stars John Dehner as Paladin, a white knight of the Old West. Equipped with brains, nerve, and a custom designed sidearm and derringer, Paladin finances his stylish and luxurious San Francisco lifestyle by serving as a defender, go-between, and hired gun for those in need - and, in the wild and wooly west of 1875, business is always g…

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Suzanne Heath is a ticket vendor for Luna Park in 1909 Coney Island. The Boardwalk is a garish, noisy place filled with bizarre shows, death-defying roller coasters, and wild and unusual shows. It is home to the tawdry, the grotesque and the unusual. A reluctant psychic, Suzanne is helping the police locate a serial killer—all of whose victims have been found horribly mutilated. Suzanne’s one true…

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Hopalong Cassidy, the iconic western cowboy hero conceived by Clarence Mulford, was immortalized in a highly popular film series starring William Boyd from 1935-1948. A tough-talking and violent character in print, Hopalong Cassidy was remade into a clean-cut screen hero who roamed the West with his sidekicks and fought villains who took advantage of the weak. Here Cassidy is drawn as Mulford orig…

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Originally published in Harte's 1875 short-story collection The Tales of the Argonauts, How Santa Claus Came to Simpson's Bar is set in California in the early 1860s and, like the rest of the tales in that collection, features the gold-seeking Argonauts. In this tale, like many of Harte's others, the folly and grit of human existence balance any good intentions, good cheer, or hope, resulting in a…

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“Imperial Leader” traces the life of one of the most important leaders of the 20th century: Winston Spencer Churchill. Through the 52 episodes, we follow Churchill from his birth in 1874 to his election as Prime Minister of England and, by the time “Imperial Leader” reaches its conclusion, we know exactly why the Empire stood behind this man in its greatest time of need, why this man was in exactl…

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Harriet Ann Jacob’s autobiography documents her life as a slave and how she attained freedom for herself and her children. Harrowing in its descriptions of sexual abuse, Jacob’s slave narrative is notable for the appeal it made to abolitionist women to open their eyes to the realities of slavery. Deemed too shocking for reading audiences at the time, the book was shelved before it was published in…

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Volume 1 of Information Please! Quiz shows had been a radio staple since the early 1930s but, in the spring of 1938, producer Dan Golenpaul had a fresh idea: why not allow the much-quizzed listeners to ask questions of the experts? This simple concept became the basis for “Information Please,” a long-running and winning series that brought wit, style, and good-natured bantering into the homes of A…

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Volume 2 of Information Please! Quiz shows had been a radio staple since the early 1930s but, in the spring of 1938, producer Dan Golenpaul had a fresh idea: why not allow the much-quizzed listeners to ask questions of the experts? This simple concept became the basis for “Information Please,” a long-running and winning series that brought wit, style, and good-natured bantering into the homes of A…

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A creaking door and a chorus of haunting organ music. No radio show opening is more memorable for many fans than the one heard on Inner Sanctum Mysteries. Inner Sanctum Mysteries was the brainchild of producer Himan Brown, inspired by the unsettling creaking door in the basement of a studio where he once worked. Brown took that inspiration and built around it a formula that lived on beyond the sho…

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Volume 2 of the Inner Sanctum Mysteries! A creaking door and a chorus of haunting organ music. No radio show opening is more memorable for many fans than the one heard on Inner Sanctum. Inner Sanctum Mysteries was the brainchild of producer Himan Brown, inspired by the unsettling creaking door in the basement of a studio where he once worked. Brown took that inspiration and built around it a formu…

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Brilliant, decisive, and hard-charging, Deputy Inspector Allhoff was the NYPD’s ace detective until bullets from a mobster’s machine gun robbed him of his legs, his career, and – in the opinion of an associate – his sanity. Yet Allhoff was too good a man to be put out to pasture, so New York’s police commissioner found a way to keep him employed and refer to him such cases as the department couldn…

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This poem describes a battle with a fearsome beast called “The Jabberwock” and is considered to be one of the greatest nonsense poems written in the English language. The poem is included in Lewis Carroll’s 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In an early scene in that novel, Alice discovers a book that is written backwar…

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From 1933 to 1951, Jack Armstrong, The All-American Boy was one of the first and most memorable of the adventure radio serials. Now, for the first time, one of the most exciting Jack Armstrong sagas has been novelized and is available from Radio Archives as a 12 hour audiobook. What is U-77, and why does Dr. Romago, a scientist who abandoned his native United States before World War II, seek it? J…

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The Jack Carson Show was a radio situation comedy that ran from 1943 until 1947, with Hollywood character actor Jack Carson playing a fictionalized version of himself as a none-too-bright movie star. Every week, he dealt with strange friends, neighbors and relatives in his hectic life in Hollywood. Jack Carson was best known and most remembered for supporting roles as comic relief, often wisecrack…

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Volume 1 of Jerry at Fair Oaks! Very few radio shows that aired during Radio’s Golden Age between the early 1930s right on up into the 1950s managed to spin off an equally successful sequel series – yet Jerry Dugan’s circus adventures proved to be so popular amongst young listeners that a sequel series about Jerry’s adventures in a military school – Jerry at Fair Oaks – quickly followed. Jerry at…

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Volume 2 of Jerry at Fair Oaks! Very few radio shows that aired during Radio’s Golden Age between the early 1930s right on up into the 1950s managed to spin off an equally successful sequel series – yet Jerry Dugan’s circus adventures proved to be so popular amongst young listeners that a sequel series about Jerry’s adventures in a military school – Jerry at Fair Oaks – quickly followed. Jerry at…

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Big-nosed, brash, and boisterous, beloved entertainer Jimmy Durante parlayed a career in vaudeville, nightclubs, and Broadway shows into a radio career highlighted by many successful programs throughout the 1930s and 1940s. After spending the war years paired with crewcutted comic Garry moore, the Great Schnozzola went solo in 1947 in an hilarious series for Rexall Drugs that also featured Arthur…

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Big-nosed, brash, and boisterous, beloved entertainer Jimmy Durante parlayed a career in vaudeville, nightclubs, and Broadway shows into a radio career highlighted by many successful programs throughout the 1930s and 1940s. After spending the war years paired with crewcutted comic Garry moore, the Great Schnozzola went solo in 1947 in an hilarious series for Rexall Drugs that also featured Arthur…

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Big-nosed, brash, and boisterous, beloved entertainer Jimmy Durante parlayed a career in vaudeville, nightclubs, and Broadway shows into a radio career highlighted by many successful programs throughout the 1930s and 1940s. After spending the war years paired with crewcutted comic Garry moore, the Great Schnozzola went solo in 1947 in an hilarious series for Rexall Drugs that also featured Arthur…

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For over fifty years, prizefighter Joe Palooka, his colorful manager Knobby Walsh, his girlfriend Ann Howe, and the many other characters that populated Ham Fisher’s famous comic strip brought enjoyment to millions of devoted readers. In 1945, Joe’s adventures came to radio in a daily series that briefly aired on local stations. In this collection, you’ll enjoy five full hours of his rare and long…

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An entertainment legend, Al Jolson was and remains a towering figure of the musical theatre. Jolson took over the venerable “Kraft Music Hall” in 1947 - a series he had headlined briefly in the early 1930s. This classic program was a masterpiece of careful planning and careful understanding of how to package a performer like Jolson to his best advantage. This collection features thirty Kraft Music…

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It’s bedtime, and six-year-old Jonathan Thomas and his teddy bear Guz are ready for a story before going to sleep. But before the story can begin, a moonbeam shines through Jonathan’s window and, much to his surprise, two little elves slide down it into his bedroom. Before Jonathan can stop him, Guz takes off after the elves and scampers up the moonbeam chasing them. Jonathan follows and soon find…

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In Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of the Earth, Professor Otto Lidenbrock discovers secret directions to the earth's core in runic code in an ancient manuscript. Enlisting his reluctant homebody nephew, Axel, to accompany him, the intrepid professor departs immediately for Iceland, the site of the mysterious crater that leads to a vast subterranean passage to the center of the earth. Filled w…

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It’s nearly Christmas and a young orphan named Tim is worried; his friend Billy is concerned that Santa Claus may not visit this year. So, late one night, Tim sets off to find Santa by following the North Star through the woods. After walking for many hours, he lies down to take a nap - and imagine his surprise when, suddenly, he awakes to discover a little boy elf not more than three inches high,…

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In Kate's Choice a young English girl inherits a financial windfall when she is suddenly orphaned. Per her father's wish, she is sent to America to live with the families of each of her four uncles in order to choose where she will live. Each family is full of wonderful, prosperous interesting people, all of them anxious that Kate should choose their family to stay with. But at Christmastime, Kate…

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Before Arthur commanded a round table of legendary knights in Camelot, he was simply a young squire with dreams of becoming a great knight himself. Arthur lived during a time when Britain was without a ruler, but fate would quickly draw him into the middle of a grand search for the next king-a search that involved a sword famously set in stone.

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First aired in 1937, The Komedy Kingdom affords us the chance to hear what a typical radio variety show was like in the 1930's and, in particular, to appreciate the wide range of performers who appeared on them. Hosted by comedienne Elvia Allman and featuring appearances by such vaudeville veterans as Morey Amsterdam and Gus Van. The series also gives film buffs the opportunity to hear bit perform…

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Did you ever wonder what happened after King Kong fell to his death off the Empire State Building back in 1933? How did New York City recover from his rampage? What became of Carl Denham, the man who brought the eighth wonder of the world to Manhattan in chains? Kong: King of Skull Island holds the answers to all those questions. This tremendous tale picks up in 1957, when Denham’s son, Vincent, d…

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In 1947, Nelson Eddy took over the summer series of Kraft Music Hall. Nelson Eddy, a classically trained baritone, is best remembered today for his nineteen films. Nelson Eddy was the highest paid singer in the world in his heyday, earning $10,000 for a single concert. Chapters: #1 Stout-Hearted Men - Rehearsal #2 June Is Bustin Out All Over - Rehearsal #3 Come to the Mardi Gras - Rehearsal #4 Ris…

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Volume 1 of Let George Do It! Before Johnny Dollar came along, radio favorite Bob Bailey was starred in an offbeat private-eye series entitled “Let George Do It”. As played by Bailey, George Valentine was an ex-cop-turned-private-investigator who eschewed muscle in favor of manual dexterity and analytical thinking skills. His friendly nemeses on the police force included Lieutenant Riley (Wally Ma…

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Volume 2 of Let George Do It! Before Johnny Dollar came along, radio favorite Bob Bailey was starred in an offbeat private-eye series entitled “Let George Do It”. As played by Bailey, George Valentine was an ex-cop-turned-private-investigator who eschewed muscle in favor of manual dexterity and analytical thinking skills. His friendly nemeses on the police force included Lieutenant Riley (Wally Ma…

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Volume 3 of Let George Do It! Before Johnny Dollar came along, radio favorite Bob Bailey was starred in an offbeat private-eye series entitled “Let George Do It”. As played by Bailey, George Valentine was an ex-cop-turned-private-investigator who eschewed muscle in favor of manual dexterity and analytical thinking skills. His friendly nemeses on the police force included Lieutenant Riley (Wally Ma…

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Volume 4 of Let George Do It! Before Johnny Dollar came along, radio favorite Bob Bailey was starred in an offbeat private-eye series entitled “Let George Do It”. As played by Bailey, George Valentine was an ex-cop-turned-private-investigator who eschewed muscle in favor of manual dexterity and analytical thinking skills. His friendly nemeses on the police force included Lieutenant Riley (Wally Ma…

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If you were a child during the Great Depression of the 1930s, its likely that you rushed to the radio each weekday afternoon just in time to hear Pierre Andre's booming voice announce that it was Adventure Time with Orphan Annie!, followed by that familiar pipe organ theme, secret society messages, and the inevitable offers for the rings and badges and mugs and premiums that could be had for just…

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Experience the wonderful world of Oz through short stories featuring characters like the Hungry Tiger, Dorothy and Toto, and the Wizard of Oz himself. Written in 1913 and published separately in an effort to revitalize the Oz series and create interest among young readers, these short stories feature the classic Oz characters in simple, charming settings that are perfect for young fans of the Oz b…

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"Little Women Based loosely on Louisa May Alcott's own upbringing, this American classic follows the lives of four sisters—Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March. Each girl has a vision of what their ideal future will bring, but each ultimately experiences, as most young people do, something completely different. Little Men Now married, Jo couldn't be happier. Along with her husband, she operates the Plumfi…

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The five young March sisters grew up on the East Coast during the American Civil War. Although they had very different personalities, their strong bond connected them as sisters throughout their childhoods and into their adult lives. They relied on one another as they faced struggles of growing up during the war and as they grew into young women. Through their adventures, they learned the importan…

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In the film noir classic The Third Man, Orson Welles played Harry Lime - rouge, scoundrel, and black marketeer in postwar Vienna. At the end of the film, in a spectacular chase through the sewers of the city, Harry met his end. But in radio's first prequel, Welles resumed the role in The Lives of Harry Lime, a series produced in England by Harry Alan Towers. Volume 1 present Lime's criminal advent…

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In the film noir classic The Third Man, Orson Welles played Harry Lime - rouge, scoundrel, and black marketeer in postwar Vienna. At the end of the film, in a spectacular chase through the sewers of the city, Harry met his end. But in radio's first prequel, Welles resumed the role in The Lives of Harry Lime, a series produced in England by Harry Alan Towers. Volume 2 present Lime's criminal advent…

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In the film noir classic The Third Man, Orson Welles played Harry Lime - rouge, scoundrel, and black marketeer in postwar Vienna. At the end of the film, in a spectacular chase through the sewers of the city, Harry met his end. But in radio's first prequel, Welles resumed the role in The Lives of Harry Lime, a series produced in England by Harry Alan Towers. Volume 3 present Lime's criminal advent…

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In the film noir classic The Third Man, Orson Welles played Harry Lime - rouge, scoundrel, and black marketeer in postwar Vienna. At the end of the film, in a spectacular chase through the sewers of the city, Harry met his end. But in radio's first prequel, Welles resumed the role in The Lives of Harry Lime, a series produced in England by Harry Alan Towers. Volume 4 present Lime's criminal advent…

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Produced and directed by William N. Robson (“Calling All Cars”, “Fort Laramie”), “Luke Slaughter of Tombstone” was one of the many adult westerns to debut on radio during the mid-1950s. The series tells the tale of a former Civil War cavalry officer who became a successful cattleman in the Arizona territory of the 1870s - a rough and tumble life, with many a gunfight and confrontation along the wa…

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The Lux Radio Theatre was radio's most important dramatic hour, commanding the top Hollywood stars, the biggest budgets - the best writing, directing, and sound effects. Cecil B. DeMille, the long time host, was often shown in publicity photographs as overseeing every aspect of each broadcast, but the reality is that the shows real directors - Tony Stanford, Frank Woodruff, Fred MacKaye and Earl E…

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The Lux Radio Theatre was radio's most important dramatic hour, commanding the top Hollywood stars, the biggest budgets - the best writing, directing, and sound effects. Cecil B. DeMille, the long time host, was often shown in publicity photographs as overseeing every aspect of each broadcast, but the reality is that the shows real directors - Tony Stanford, Frank Woodruff, Fred MacKaye and Earl E…

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The Lux Radio Theatre was radio's most important dramatic hour, commanding the top Hollywood stars, the biggest budgets - the best writing, directing, and sound effects. Cecil B. DeMille, the long time host, was often shown in publicity photographs as overseeing every aspect of each broadcast, but the reality is that the shows real directors - Tony Stanford, Frank Woodruff, Fred MacKaye and Earl E…

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In this volume you will be hearing radio adaptations of some of the funniest comedies Hollywood had to offer. This collection includes the granddaddy of all screwball comedies, It Happened One Night, Frank Capra's funny love story about a runaway heiress and the reporter who becomes her protector. You'll hear The Awful Truth, Leo McCarey's frenetic comedy of marital errors. And remember James Cagn…

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Get ready to listen to some of the finest films Hollywood ever produced, because The Lux Radio Theatre is on the air. In this classic collection you'll hear some of the best lighthearted comedies from the golden age of Hollywood. Hosted by Hollywood legend Cecil B. DeMille, these 6 shows are interesting not only as great radio plays, but they stand as a kind of what if scenario for movie buffs. Fo…

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Traverse the dark side in this amazing collection. Lux Radio Theatre provides a fascinating what if situation when you hear Ray Milland in Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train, and Edward G. Robinson starring as Sam Spade in the Maltese Falcon. John Garfield is back in Dust Be My Destiny. William Powell and Myrna Loy are Nick and Nora Charles in The Thin Man, and also appear in Manhattan Melodr…

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Meet Gregory George Gordon Green, commonly known among his friends as “Gees.” He’s a private detective working between the two World Wars with the odd habit of becoming entangled in mysteries involving the supernatural. Supposedly the creation of “Jack Mann,” Gees’ adventures were actually written by E. Charles Vivian, the closest author England produced in the period from 1920-1940 to a pulp prac…

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Taken from the poverty of her parents' home in Portsmouth, Fanny Price is brought up with her rich cousins at Mansfield Park, acutely aware of her humble rank and with her cousin Edmund as her sole ally. During her uncle's absence in Antigua, the Crawford's arrive in the neighborhood bringing with them the glamour of London life and a reckless taste for flirtation. Mansfield Park is considered Jan…

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One of the best-loved stories of all time, Pulitzer prize-winner To Kill a Mockingbird has sold more than forty million copies worldwide, served as the basis for an enormously popular motion picture. A gripping, heart-wrenching, and wholly remarkable tale of coming-of-age in a South poisoned by virulent prejudice, it views a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young g…

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Andy Rooney once observed, A lot of people think, as I do, that they appreciate Bob and Ray more than anyone else does. Included in that lot of people are undoubtedly classic radio fans, many of whom have delighted in the offbeat radio antics of Messrs. Elliott and Goulding for the past half-century. Both men capitalized on their uncanny ability to intuit what each other was thinking to carve a sm…

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Before creating cinematic masterpieces like Citizen Kane, Orson Welles' established his creative credentials with The Mercury Theatre on the Air, an hour-long showcase which allowed him, producer John Houseman, musical director Bernard Hermann, and a close knit team of performers and technicians to broadcast innovative adaptations of both well known and obscure stories and programs that quickly se…

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In the postwar years, MGM Radio Attractions attempted to duplicate the success of many of radio’s popular anthology series with its own showcase, “MGM Theatre of the Air”. Dramatizing popular films from the studio’s vaults, as well as showcasing top guest stars such as Marlene Dietrich and Rex Harrison, the series sometimes even managed to secure the service of the original performer or performers…

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Come along as four young adventurers go exploring in a magical meadow, only to find out that there is more mischief afoot in this Fairy Wood than they might have expected. Hilarious mayhem abounds in this introduction to Shakespeare's classic comedy.

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His comedy was once described by Time Magazine as the acme of hysterical vulgarity and, for more than seventy years, Milton Berle never lost his taste for good old-fashioned bust-a-gut laughs. But it took the veteran performer the better part of two decades to find a radio format that genuinely suited him and, when he did, the result was The Milton Berle Show, a 1947-48 NBC series that stands toda…

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His comedy was once described by Time Magazine as the acme of hysterical vulgarity and, for more than seventy years, Milton Berle never lost his taste for good old-fashioned bust-a-gut laughs. But it took the veteran performer the better part of two decades to find a radio format that genuinely suited him and, when he did, the result was The Milton Berle Show, a 1947-48 NBC series that stands toda…

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Widely considered one of the great American novels, Herman Melville's masterpiece went largely unread during his lifetime and was out of print at the time of his death in 1891. Called the greatest book about the sea ever written by D.H. Lawrence, Moby Dick features detailed descriptions of whale hunting and whale oil extraction as well as beautiful, incisive writing on race, class, religion, art,…

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When Ishmael joined the crew of a whaling ship called the Pequod, he was eager for a life of adventure on the high seas. But he didn’t know that what he was about to embark on would be the adventure of a lifetime. With Captain Ahab at the helm, Ishmael and his crewmates quickly learned that they weren't simply hunting whales. They were on a quest for the biggest catch there ever was: the great whi…

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Volume 1 of Mr. President! The distinctive voice of Edward Arnold is featured in “Mr, President”, an anthology series that dramatizes little-known incidents “of the men who have lived in the White House -- dramatic, exciting events in their lives that you and I rarely hear.” The uniqueness of the program is that the President is never identified during the proceedings; the great man’s name is reve…

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Volume 2 of Mr. President! The distinctive voice of Edward Arnold is featured in “Mr, President”, an anthology series that dramatizes little-known incidents “of the men who have lived in the White House -- dramatic, exciting events in their lives that you and I rarely hear.” The uniqueness of the program is that the President is never identified during the proceedings; the great man’s name is reve…

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Considered to be one of Virginia Woolf's most popular novels, Mrs. Dalloway follows one high-society woman as she goes about her day planning a splendid party for her acquaintances. As she goes about her day, she ponders on the life she could be living had she not married the reliable Richard Dalloway, and instead sought the enigmatic Peter Walsh. At one point, she muses on the fact that she had n…

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In Mrs. Podgers' Teapot, an old woman and her boarder take in an orphan on a cold winter's night. The child's natural spirit of generosity moves Mrs. Podgers, and helps her find true happiness at Christmas.

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Fall in love with this Shakespearean comedy about finding and losing love. A host of characters try to act as matchmakers for a young couple, while another couple is to be married. But everything doesn't go as planned when a meddling villain schemes to ruin the wedding.

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In the 1930s, radio was still a new form of entertainment, bringing news, sports, comedy, and drama into millions of depression-era homes throughout the country. Despite the economic conditions, Americans were still in desperate need of entertainment - and radio was there to give it to them, free, with just a flick of the switch and a turn of the dial. In this remarkable 10-CD set, you’ll have the…

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Proof positive that Radio Drama is timeless, Mutual Radio Theater was a program produced originally in 1980. This show was no small attempt to recapture the glory days of Old Time Radio by any means. Each program was written specifically for radio and each night hosted by a different star. Lorne Greene hosted Western Night on Monday. Andy Griffith followed on Tuesday with Comedy Night. Vincent Pri…

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What would it take to recapture the glory of the golden age of radio and still incorporate the stars and even stories of a more modern time? Mutual Radio Theater answered this question of blending the classic with the modern by doing just that- putting classic Radio legends to work alongside up and coming stars of the 1980s! Mutual Radio Theater featured stories written by radio greats such as Arc…

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Any program needs its own special energy, something that drives it to be the best of the best. Mutual Radio Theater, Volume 3 features programs with just that. Star power. Each night of the week, a different star hosted the program. As for the actors, names from the golden era of radio drama included John Dehner, Vic Perrin, Hans Conried, Marvin Miller, Parley Baer, Elliot Lewis, Jeff Corey, Virgi…

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In 1980, a perfect storm came together in terms of radio drama revival. Top talent of the classic era of radio and modern entertainment worked hand in hand on Mutual Radio Theater, a multi genre show harkening back to classic anthologies of the past. Each program written specifically for radio included scripts penned by such radio legends as Arch Oboler, Norman Corwin, and Elliot Lewis. Each night…

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Lorne Greene and Westerns. Andy Griffith and Comedy. Vincent Price and Mystery. Cicely Tyson and Love & Hate. Leonard Nimoy and Adventure. Only one Radio Program boasted this line up and lived up to it. And that was just the nightly hosts! Mutual Radio Theater! The shows were peopled with stars from both classic radio and modern television and movies, including John Dehner, Vic Perrin, Virginia Gr…

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"Armed with two dozen pink lollipops, rubber bands, chewing gum, and a fine-toothed comb, young Elmer runs away with an alley cat to a faraway island. There, he must overcome fierce beasts in order to rescue a baby dragon. The first of a three-part series, which includes Elmer and the Dragon and The Dragons of Blueland, this Newbery Honor Book and ALA Notable Book has been in print continuously fo…

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It wasn’t uncommon for a radio series to be associated with a publishing firm, but “Mystery House” gave book promotion a slight twist. In each program, the staff members of Mystery House, “that strange publishing firm owned by Dan and Barbara Glenn”, would pitch in to perform a half-hour mystery, while others would provide sound effects, rewrite scripts and so on, with the premise of demonstrating…

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Glenn Langan stars as mystery writer Barton Drake, a well-spoken sophisticate who is fascinated by the ways of the criminal mind. His writing has given him a comfortable income, allowing him to freely pursue the details of whatever new case may come his way - and come they do, with a seemingly endless array of robberies, suspicious deaths, and unsolved murders to fascinate his interests. Drake is…

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This memoir written by writer, orator, and former slave Frederick Douglass describes, in gripping detail, the circumstances of his upbringing, his brutal treatment at the hands of slave-owners, and his narrow escape from Maryland to freedom. Written in 1845, this narrative is one of the most famous works of American literature and provided fuel for the abolitionist movement that began in the early…

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A Necroscope is a person with an ESP power that allows him to speak with the dead. Communication is two-way and peaceful. Harry Keough is the greatest Necroscope in the world. Harry Keough is the master of the Mobius Continuum – another dimension existing parallel to all space and time. It serves as his personal instantaneous gateway to anywhere in the known universe, past or present. It’s a major…

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A Necroscope is a person with an ESP power that allows him to speak with the dead. Communication is two-way and peaceful. Harry Keough is the greatest Necroscope in the world. Harry Keough is in love with Bonnie Jean – a beautiful Scottish werewolf whose friendly pack and flourishing pub have given him a place he can almost call home. His life has finally taken a turn for the better. Or so he thin…

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The New Adventures of Michael Shayne, Volume 1 stars Jeff Chandler as Brett Halliday's reckless, redheaded Irishman in a series of detective adventures that bring the dark and brooding atmosphere of film noir to radio. Cynical, action packed, and violent, with fists and bullets flying practically every second, this gritty and hard-boiled series is directed by William P. Rousseau in a slam bang man…

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The New Adventures of Michael Shayne, Volume 2 stars Jeff Chandler as Brett Halliday's reckless, redheaded Irishman in a series of detective adventures that bring the dark and brooding atmosphere of film noir to radio. Cynical, action packed, and violent, with fists and bullets flying practically every second, this gritty and hard-boiled series is directed by William P. Rousseau in a slam bang man…

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He's the smartest and the stubbornest, the fattest and the laziest, the cleverest and the craziest - the most extravagant detective in the world. Yes it is Nero Wolfe, Rex Stout's gourmand orchid fancier and one of the most eccentric and unique detectives ever to hit the airwaves. Starring character actor Sydney Greenstreet The Maltese Falcon, The New Adventures of Nero Wolfe is an immensely enter…

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For many long time fans, Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce will always personify Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson, but it may come as a surprise to even the most devoted Baker Street enthusiast to discover that, for one radio season the World's Greatest consulting Detective was portrayed by actor Tom Cornway; best remembered for playing The Falcon in a series of 1940s films. Now these rare programs…

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For many long time fans, Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce will always personify Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson, but it may come as a surprise to even the most devoted Baker Street enthusiast to discover that, for one radio season the World's Greatest consulting Detective was portrayed by actor Tom Cornway; best remembered for playing The Falcon in a series of 1940s films. Now these rare programs…

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“Night Watch” was radio’s first “reality show”, a program that brought live and authentic police drama to the airwaves. Each week, Don Reed accompanied Officer Ron Perkins on the night watch in Culver City, California. Traveling in an unmarked car, Reed used a heavy battery-powered tape recorder, complete with a microphone cleverly concealed inside the casing of a flashlight, to participate in and…

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In 1950, NBC began broadcasting Nightbeat, considered one of the finest shows of its time, about Randy Stone, a reporter who covered the night beat for the Chicago Star with a unique blend of wit, compassion and toughness. From murder to mystery, from heartache to hardboiled, every night brought a new story to Randy Stone. Radio Archives invites you to listen to six brand new Nightbeat stories in…

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Volume 1 of Nightbeat Frank Lovejoy stars as hard-nosed Chicago Star newsman Randy Stone, a reporter who looks for the human stories behind the headlines. Lovejoy’s distinctive voice and manner, combined with excellent scripts and performances by radio veterans like Lurene Tuttle, Peter Leeds, and Jeff Corey, give the series an unusual and engrossing style - literally film noir for the mind. One w…

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Volume 2 of Nightbeat Frank Lovejoy stars as hard-nosed Chicago Star newsman Randy Stone, a reporter who looks for the human stories behind the headlines. Lovejoy’s distinctive voice and manner, combined with excellent scripts and performances by radio veterans like Lurene Tuttle, Peter Leeds, and Jeff Corey, give the series an unusual and engrossing style - literally film noir for the mind. One w…

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Volume 3 of Nightbeat Frank Lovejoy stars as hard-nosed Chicago Star newsman Randy Stone, a reporter who looks for the human stories behind the headlines. Lovejoy’s distinctive voice and manner, combined with excellent scripts and performances by radio veterans like Lurene Tuttle, Peter Leeds, and Jeff Corey, give the series an unusual and engrossing style - literally film noir for the mind. One w…

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Originally published in the 1853 Christmas edition of Dickens' journal Household Words, Nobody's Story uses the differences between the Big Wig family and the Nobody family to call attention to class-based inequity. This version of Nobody's Story is part of Dreamscape's The Christmas Stories of Charles Dickens.

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During an eventful season at Bath, young, naïve Catherine Morland experiences the joys of fashionable society for the first time. She is delighted to make new acquaintances, including flirtatious Isabella, who shares her love of Gothic romance and horror, and the sophisticated Henry and Eleanor Tilney. When the Tilneys invite her to their family’s mysterious home, Northanger Abbey, she’s eager to…

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In the tradition of The Exorcist, Jay Bonansinga’s novel, Oblivion takes the listener on a unique and frightening ride towards Armageddon. Witness a dramatic showdown between good and evil as mankind’s salvation rests in the hands of a burnt-out priest. Father Martin Delaney, a drunken ex-priest, is torn away from his liquor by a well-dressed stranger who turns out to be his former altar boy. The…

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Who is The Octopus? All of Manhattan trembles at the mention of the name cloaking the most malevolent mastermind since Fu Manchu. Leader of the Purple Eyes Cult. Master of a legion of deformed monsters that were once men. Would-be conquer of the world. A titan of tentacled terror. Who could defeat such a fiend? Only a hero as ruthless as he! Out of the ghetto emerges the kindly Dr. Skull, healer o…

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"Warm and delightfully festive, this charming and long forgotten holiday classic was inspired, in part, by Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol and other celebrations of old-time Yule. Splendid suppers, rural churches, cheerful dances, and hearty spirits imbue this short novel with the magic of the season."

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Screen legend Harold Lloyd hosts Volume 1 of The Old Gold Comedy Theatre, a 1944/45 NBC anthology series featuring some of the top names in film and radio. Presenting half-hour versions of popular film comedies in much the same way that The Lux Radio Theater did with drama, this delightful and star-studded series was long considered a lost show until an almost complete set of recordings was found…

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Screen legend Harold Lloyd hosts Volume 2 of The Old Gold Comedy Theatre, a 1944/45 NBC anthology series featuring some of the top names in film and radio. Presenting half-hour versions of popular film comedies in much the same way that The Lux Radio Theater did with drama, this delightful and star-studded series was long considered a lost show until an almost complete set of recordings was found…

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Born in a workhouse and sold into an apprenticeship with an undertaker, young orphan Oliver Twist escapes and travels through London. While on his adventure, he meets Jack Dawkins, a member of a gang of juvenile pickpockets led by the elderly criminal Fagin. Caught in a life of immorality, Oliver finds himself taken away by a kind gentleman who leads him to a life he had never anticipated for hims…

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Volume 1 of One Man's Family! Carlton E. Morse is no stranger to radio enthusiasts, with a resume that includes “I Love a Mystery” and “Adventures by Morse.” However, it is his long-running radio serial “One Man’s Family” that stands out as his greatest creation. From 1932 to 1959 this prestigious drama entertained audiences with a weekly and later daily glimpse into the lives of an authentic Amer…

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Volume 2 of One Man's Family! Carlton E. Morse is no stranger to radio enthusiasts, with a resume that includes “I Love a Mystery” and “Adventures by Morse.” However, it is his long-running radio serial “One Man’s Family” that stands out as his greatest creation. From 1932 to 1959 this prestigious drama entertained audiences with a weekly and later daily glimpse into the lives of an authentic Amer…

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James Christopher is the real name of the legendary Intelligence Service agent designated as Operator #5. Armed with a .45 automatic and a flexible rapier concealed in his belt, he stood against the fearsome forces—both foreign and domestic—who were bent on destroying the United States of America. During the dark days of the Great Depression, when Europe was overrun by fascist dictators, he was ou…

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A happy crowd, inspired by the spirit of Christmas, was milling joyously in Times Square, New York. Suddenly, cutting through the sounds of gayety, came a shrill whine. It became louder, and at the very second of midnight, a gigantic shell exploded, killing, maiming, destroying! At twelve hour intervals thereafter — no man knew in advance where — another shell burst devastatingly. Two great powers…

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A group of bitter men — a secret League of War — was ready to plunge the world into a new, earth-wide conflict. They issued orders, and bloody organized murder was loosed in the heart of Europe! And behind this carnage, a single man was scheming to make himself the Dictator of the World! Never before had a single person conceived such a colossal plan for profiting from the slaughter of humans. He…

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The news spread like wild-fire. A man had solved the problem of the ages — he was bringing the dead back to life! Operator #5, ace of the American Secret Service, recognized the grave menace. He realized the danger if the gigantic advances of modern science were employed selfishly by unscrupulous men. And that precisely was the danger facing his native land! The Master of Death, using the promise…

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Oil — black gold — the blood of Mother Earth! America had squandered its precious reserves and a syndicate of skilled saboteurs was destroying the remaining store! With all National defense rendered helpless for want of it, bitter despair gripped the hearts of the country’s millions. Pillage, slaughter, and slavery — misery and death — threatened each American! And Jimmy Christopher, Operator #5 o…

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By plague and fire, bribery and chicanery, terrorism and extortion, the insane dictator Ursus Young has established himself as the supreme ruler of America. Who is left with sufficient strength to thwart him? Already he has scattered far and wide the organization of which Operator #5, America’s Secret Service Ace, forms so important a part. Against such tremendous, dictatorial power Jimmy Christop…

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By land and by sea the ferocious Hordes descend upon the United States, dealing destruction with new and horrifying weapons: with viscid poisons, with lethal gases, with flaming thermite — and with an invisible death-force more fearful, more annihilating than any weapon yet known to man. Before the ruthless Asiatic Invaders even Operator #5, America’s Secret Service Ace, stands helpless — hunted l…

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Like the tentacles of a gigantic and loathsome octopus, the ends of that infamous international espionage ring had stretched out across the United States. Lusting for power, the fiendish leader of that ring was stripping the country of its entire armaments; butchering, in the very capital of the nation, the patriots who pleaded for adequate war-strength. Operator #5, America’s Secret Service Ace,…

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Gold — the mineral which fosters war! — threatened to plunge America into a chaos of revolt, misery and death. In Washington, the fortified vaults of the nation’s Treasury lay empty — stripped of wealth. A madman, obscured in mystery, his face concealed by a mask of the precious metal, had allied himself with powerful foreign magnates to deliver the United States into misery and bondage. Robbed of…

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Mysterious happenings — cloudbursts in the arid desert, churches and skyscrapers horribly destroyed, priests and pastors oddly maddened, Intelligence agents craftily slaughtered — all these heralded the attack on America by the Son of Kasma — spokesman for a vicious, Oriental cult. The populace flocked to the new religion in self-defense. Our country seemed helplessly doomed... And Operator #5, ch…

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As suddenly as Death, the bitter cold came, and with it, the armored tanks, sleek submarines and mailed warriors of the invading legions! An international syndicate, fearing America’s greatness and strength in war, had unleashed savage war-dogs to win the conflict before it fairly began... The greatest military genius of modern times commanded the enemy, and Operator #5 of the United States Secret…

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James Christopher is the real name of the legendary Intelligence Service agent designated as Operator #5. Armed with a .45 automatic and a flexible rapier concealed in his belt, he stood against the fearsome forces—both foreign and domestic—who were bent on destroying the United States of America. During the dark days of the Great Depression, when Europe was overrun by fascist dictators, he was ou…

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No man could explain that death which struck from the stratosphere, turning men into statues, stripping the United States of defenses. Operator #5 — Ace of the American Secret Service — uncovered an espionage organization which was working against our country when Washington recaptured Yorktown, in 1781!... But now, a madman with limitless ambition headed the Secret Loyalists, determined to make h…

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James Christopher is the real name of the legendary Intelligence Service agent designated as Operator #5. The first reports were incredible. Montezuma the Third, Emperor of the new born Aztec Empire, was slaughtering American troops with a deadly, new weapon… sacrificing captives to his ancient gods… America seemed condemned to degrading slavery. Operator #5, Ace of the Secret Service, fought agai…

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The most deadly weapon in history — a green mist which turned all it touched to flaming ruin — was ravaging America! Far off in Etoria, war-dog kingdom of the Mediterranean, a power-mad demagogue plotted the conquest of the world, and subjugating our land was his first wily move...! While the United States government prepares to surrender humbly — while war scars a thousand-mile front in Europe —…

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Once again James Christopher, known in the secret archives of Washington as Operator #5, is called on to battle a deadly threat to American freedom. Those strange, impassioned orators preached peace and the brotherhood of man — as they tongue-lashed their eager, duped recruits to brutal deeds, bloody violence, and suicide... While dull-witted authorities ridiculed Jimmy Christopher — Operator #5 o…

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A brawny coolie from the filthy waterfront of Hong Kong was Emperor of Asia and master of the vast reaches of Russia. Armed with mysterious new weapons which made the bravest man craven, he marched ruthlessly to conquer the world, and to win the proud daughter of the Muscovite nobility who scorned his amorous advances... Jimmy Christopher — Operator #5 of the United States Intelligence — had given…

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James Christopher is the real name of the legendary Intelligence Service agent designated as Operator #5. Men blanched at that name — the Scarlet Baron! Ambitious master of the united Underworld, he promised boundless riches for all! But Jimmy Christopher — Operator #5 of the Intelligence — understood the true purpose behind the new plague of rapine and murder. With the gallant Federal G-men slaug…

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It began with the mysterious collapse of a new suspension bridge spanning the Mississippi River. But that was only the beginning. Soon battleships, Army fortifications, coastal defenses, even skyscrapers were crumbling under the strange corroding Dust of Doom. What malevolent force was obliterating America’s most important military sites? What shadowy person or nation stood behind these atrocities…

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Secretly, behind closed doors and guarded portals, the mysterious Black Power of Zaava spread its hidden terror throughout America. What evil force was behind the destruction of churches; the wholesale disappearance of entire congregations? What sinister spell had fallen upon American men and women to make them hurl themselves into white-hot flaming furnaces? A trap worse than death is laid for Op…

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Chaos, confusion, disintegration fall with swift, breath-taking disaster upon America! Already terrorized by a tottering, unstable world, American men and women are swept into a mad stampede when the great leaders of the nation are spirited away, one by one, to return broken men, useless, inept. Here Jimmy Christopher — Operator #5 — sets forth on his most thrilling and dangerous exploit while the…

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Once again James Christopher, known in the secret archives of Washington as Operator #5, is called on to battle a deadly threat to American freedom. A powerful army of invasion — armed with the most ghastly modern weapons: bacteria, plagues, hideous diseases — lay carefully hidden within the borders of the United States, ready to strike at the heart of the nation, to kill, pillage, demolish... A f…

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The mad Emperor, warrior descendant of the ravagers of Asia, unleashed a new, horrible, ingenious weapon against the American people. While Mongols bent over a powerful death-machine, a thousand miles away, the air became unbreathable! Men and women and children — all living things — gasped for life-giving oxygen, and with searing, heaving lungs, fell strangled by the mysterious, deadly element. A…

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Speeding through the silent blackness of the night, a long freight-train was laden with a cargo more precious than fine gold – wheat! Then suddenly, the hirelings of Apocryphos unleashed red destruction, and the great machine lay wrecked, its cars of priceless grain afire…Another blow in the ruthless campaign that was driving a proud people, whimpering, to slavery – overwhelmed by the cruel pangs…

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Once again, James Christopher, known in the secret archives of Washington as Operator #5, is called on to battle a deadly threat to American freedom in Curtis Steele's The Yellow Scourge! This time, the treacherous criminal nation he defeated in The Invisible Empire has risen up again to strike a bloody blow against the United States.

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Also known as Superstition on the Air, The Origin of Superstition was a 1935 series of short stories that showcased many popular superstitions of modern life, explaining when, where, how and why they originated. In episodes such as Rabbit's Foot and Breaking a Mirror, you may hear superstitions that you yourself observe, and come to understand their origins. Included in the series are superstition…

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Four women meet in the pediatric ICU of a hospital. Each one of them carries the baggage, joys, disappointments, silence, and secrets that form the canvas of life. Three of them know each other from other stays in the hospital; they take care of children suffering from chronic diseases; they are mothers of the ICU. The fourth, Carmen, appears one night in the ER. Her daughter was run over by a car…

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Peace from Heaven is an impressionistic poem written by Louisa May Alcott that weaves together pagan and Christian imagery to communicate the special magic of the Christmas season.

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Detective Philo Vance first appeared in a series of novels written by S. S. Van Dine. In his original incarnation, Vance was a stylish fop but, by the time he made his way to radio, many of his arrogant edges had been smoothed out, giving him the charm he often lacked on the printed page. In 1948, played by the inimitable Jackson Beck and supported by Joan Alexander, Vance deduced his way through…

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Detective Philo Vance first appeared in a series of novels written by S. S. Van Dine. He was originally a stylish fop but, by the time he made his way to radio, many of his arrogant edges had been smoothed out, giving him the charm he often lacked on the printed page. In 1948, played by the inimitable Jackson Beck and supported by Joan Alexander, Vance began deducing his way through 104 baffling m…

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Detective Philo Vance first appeared in a series of novels written by S. S. Van Dine. He was originally a stylish fop but, by the time he made his way to radio, many of his arrogant edges had been smoothed out, giving him the charm he often lacked on the printed page. In 1948, played by the inimitable Jackson Beck and supported by Joan Alexander, Vance began deducing his way through 104 baffling m…

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Sophisticated detective Philo Vance first appeared in a series of novels written by S. S. Van Dine. He was originally a stylish and erudite fop but, by the time he made his way to radio, much of his arrogance had been smoothed out, giving him the charm he often lacked on the printed page. In 1948, played by the inimitable Jackson Beck and supported by Joan Alexander, Vance began deducing his way t…

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Detective Philo Vance first appeared in a series of novels written by S. S. Van Dine. In his original incarnation, Vance was a stylish fop but, by the time he made his way to radio, many of his arrogant edges had been smoothed out, giving him the charm he often lacked on the printed page. In 1948, played by the inimitable Jackson Beck and supported by Joan Alexander, Vance deduced his way through…

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The Planet Man, a campy and low-budget graduate of the Space Patrol school of juvenile entertainment, serves up plenty of breezy not-to-be-taken-seriously adventure fun. It is the golly-gee-whillikers saga of Dantro, intergalactic troubleshooter for an organization known as the League of Planets. The League sends Dantro out into the celestial world to maintain law and order. Assisted by members of…

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The Planet Man, a campy and low-budget graduate of the Space Patrol school of juvenile entertainment, serves up plenty of breezy not-to-be-taken-seriously adventure fun. It is the golly-gee-whillikers saga of Dantro, intergalactic troubleshooter for an organization known as the League of Planets. The League sends Dantro out into the celestial world to maintain law and order. Assisted by members of…

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In the magical lands of Noland and Ix, two regions adjacent to Oz, the fairies of the forest of Burzee have made an incredible magic cloak that grants its wearer one wish. Queen Zixi, who is now 683 years old but appears just sixteen, covets the cloak in the hopes of reversing a curse that makes mirrors reflect her true age.

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Boasting one of the largest arrays of guest stars ever featured on a single series, the Radio Hall of Fame was one of the most distinguished - and expensive - radio shows of the 1940s. Designed to bring prestige to the then-fledgling Blue Network of the American Broadcasting Company, each week the editors of the Variety, the bible of show business, would select which singers, actors, performers, s…

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Boasting one of the largest arrays of guest stars ever featured on a single series, the Radio Hall of Fame was one of the most distinguished - and expensive - radio shows of the 1940s. Designed to bring prestige to the then-fledgling Blue Network of the American Broadcasting Company, each week the editors of the Variety, the bible of show business, would select which singers, actors, performers, s…

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Popular singers singing popular songs were always a part of radio, but it was not until the mid 1940s that vocalists really began to dominate the music scene. This tuneful collection turns the spotlight on fourteen of the most popular vocalists and musical ensembles of the mid 20th century, appearing in thirty full length radio broadcasts dating from 1944 through 1959. Taken from original transcri…

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Hop on the star-studded show train as Gordon MacRae sings and stars in the first Volume of The Railroad Hour, a lush and tuneful series of musical programs offering vest-pocket versions of musical comedies and operettas, everything from the romantic melodies of Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg right through to the musical comedies of Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin, as well as fa…

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Hop on the star-studded show train as Gordon MacRae sings and stars in the second Volume of The Railroad Hour, a lush and tuneful series of musical programs offering vest-pocket versions of musical comedies and operettas, everything from the romantic melodies of Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg right through to the musical comedies of Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin, as well as f…

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Hop on the star-studded show train as Gordon MacRae sings and stars in the third Volume of The Railroad Hour, a lush and tuneful series of musical programs offering vest-pocket versions of musical comedies and operettas, everything from the romantic melodies of Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg right through to the musical comedies of Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin, as well as fa…

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Hop on the star-studded show train as Gordon MacRae sings and stars in the fourth Volume of The Railroad Hour, a lush and tuneful series of musical programs offering vest-pocket versions of musical comedies and operettas, everything from the romantic melodies of Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg right through to the musical comedies of Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin, as well as f…

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Volume 1 of Richard Diamond, Private Detective! Combining Dick Powell’s tough-guy image with his impressive way with a song, “Richard Diamond, Private Detective” featured a hard-boiled gumshoe who rarely took himself too seriously; he was, simply, an ex-cop who had decided to hang out his own shingle in the investigation business. He demonstrated a breezy insouciance to authority, generally conclu…

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Volume 2 of Richard Diamond, Private Detective! Combining Dick Powell’s tough-guy image with his impressive way with a song, “Richard Diamond, Private Detective” featured a hard-boiled gumshoe who rarely took himself too seriously; he was, simply, an ex-cop who had decided to hang out his own shingle in the investigation business. He demonstrated a breezy insouciance to authority, generally conclu…

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Most fans of Western fiction know Paul S. Powers as one of the foundation authors of the famous pulp magazine of the 1930s and 1940s, Wild West Weekly, in which his popular characters Sonny Tabor, Kid Wolf, Freckles Malone, and Johnny Forty-five appeared for fifteen years. Lesser known is the career Powers had after Wild West Weekly stopped publication in 1943. Powers continued to write for the be…

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Rinkitink, a plump jolly fellow, and his grouchy goat Bilbil assist Inga, the crown prince of Pingaree, in reclaiming his lost kingdom from invaders. Inga is helped in his efforts by three magic pearls: one, blue, giving him superhuman strength; one, pink, protecting him from harm; and one, white, providing him with words of wisdom. But when the pearls are lost, can Queen Ozma, watching events on…

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"In New York's Catskill Mountains before the American Revolution, a Dutch-American villager named Rip Van Winkle falls asleep and wakes up twenty years later without realizing how much time has passed. Unaware that the Revolutionary War has taken place, he must come to terms with the changes he encounters. Washington Irving wrote “Rip Van Winkle” while living in England as part of the collection T…

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Volume 1 of Rocky Jordan! Flashing eyes and flashing knives...intrigue, mystery, and murder. It’s time for another exotic adventure in post-war Cairo with “Rocky Jordan”, starring Jack Moyles as the handsome and sometimes cynical owner of the Cafe Tambourine, gathering place for fez-wearing diamond smugglers, black marketeers, gun runners, racketeers, and international thieves. In Cairo, it seems,…

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Volume 2 of Rocky Jordan! Flashing eyes and flashing knives...intrigue, mystery, and murder. It’s time for another exotic adventure in post-war Cairo with “Rocky Jordan”, starring Jack Moyles as the handsome and sometimes cynical owner of the Cafe Tambourine, gathering place for fez-wearing diamond smugglers, black marketeers, gun runners, racketeers, and international thieves. In Cairo, it seems,…

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Volume 3 of Rocky Jordan! Flashing eyes and flashing knives...intrigue, mystery, and murder. It’s time for another exotic adventure in post-war Cairo with “Rocky Jordan”, starring Jack Moyles as the handsome and sometimes cynical owner of the Cafe Tambourine, gathering place for fez-wearing diamond smugglers, black marketeers, gun runners, racketeers, and international thieves. In Cairo, it seems,…

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In Rosa's Tale, Louisa May Alcott spins a heartwarming fable about a horse who magically speaks to a lonely girl at midnight on Christmas Eve..

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A cowboy singer and actor, Roy Rogers was one of the most popular Western stars of the twentieth century. Appearing in over one hundred films, and numerous television and radio appearances, he became known as the King of the Cowboys, the embodiment of the all-American hero to many. Roy was often joined by his wife, Dale Evans, Queen of the West, as well as his famous golden palomino Trigger, which…

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A cowboy singer and actor, Roy Rogers was one of the most popular Western stars of the twentieth century. Appearing in over one hundred films, and numerous television and radio appearances, he became known as the King of the Cowboys, the embodiment of the all-American hero to many. Roy was often joined by his wife, Dale Evans, Queen of the West, as well as his famous golden palomino Trigger, which…

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A late entry in the Hollywood-movie-adaptation genre, “Screen Directors’ Playhouse” stands out as one of the forgotten gems of radio’s twilight years. The program aired on NBC for just two and a half years, but during that time, the series impressed listeners with excellent scripts and casting decisions based more on radio aptitude than Hollywood star power. The result is a series which deserves a…

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Escaping certain death in the electric chair, the enigmatic adventurer known only as King welds a disparate group of trained professionals into the crime-fighting force called The Secret 6! Their sacred mission: To destroy super-criminals whenever they surface! For their first assignment, these fighting fugitives from justice track down the sinister strangler known only as The Red Shadow. Who is h…

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The Secret 6 are back! Fresh from demolishing The Red Shadow in their first exploit, the mysterious adventurer known only as King, backed by an army of underworld informants, leads the Secret 6 into new catacombs of horror and peril. When wealthy James Waldroff rises from his own tomb to walk the Earth again, King and his team are propelled along a trail of terror that leads to a haunted Mayan rui…

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The Secret 6 face their greatest challenge yet when a vicious horde of giant dogs invade Manhattan, ripping apart innocent citizens at random! No sooner are these creatures vanquished, than the rampage continues - this time conducted by marauding men as gigantic as Paul Bunyan! What is the evil purpose of this plague of man - monsters? Who commands them? Why are they slaying people with impunity?…

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When Mary Lennox was uprooted from her home in India and sent to live with her mysterious uncle, Mr. Craven, at gloomy Misselthwaite Manor, a very contrary Mary assumed the worst. But after exploring the grounds, she discovered that it just takes a little bit of magic to help gardens and friendships bloom.

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A dark night, ominous fog, a sense of mounting fear - Suddenly, a shadow fall across your path, the Shadow of Fu Manchu! Created by writer Sax Rohmer, the sinister criminal mastermind is one of the most memorable villains in literary history, personifying the fascination and fear with which many Westerners viewed the cultures of the Far East at the turn of the 20th century. After appearing in a po…

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Siddhartha: Booktrack Edition adds an immersive musical soundtrack to your audiobook listening experience! Siddhartha, the ninth book written by Hermann Hesse, is about a young Indian boy who leaves his home in hopes of finding enlightenment with the wise “Goutama”, which in this story is the Buddha. After learning what he can from Goutama, he decides to go off into the busy city, and leads a life…

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During radio’s Golden Age, vocalists and musical groups were often the stars of their own daily or weekly radio shows. Teamed with full studio orchestras and harmonizing vocal groups, these tuneful and relaxing programs were often the way for an unknown band singer to become a superstar star in their own right. In this fully restored collection, transferred from original recordings, you’ll enjoy n…

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“Space Patrol” outlines the exploits of Commander Buzz Corey (Ed Kemmer), head of a 30th-century police-keeping force operating from the planet Terra. Assisting Corey is his youthful sidekick Cadet Happy (Lyn Osborne), as well as Major “Robbie” Robertson (Ken Meyer), Dr. Van Meter (Rudolph Anders) and Carol Karlyle (Virginia Hewett). Corey’s struggle to maintain law and order is frequently hampere…

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In the postwar years, MGM adapted many of its movie properties for radio, and one of its most successful transfers was The Story of Dr. Kildare, starring Lew Ayers in the title role of Lionel Barrymore as his crusty, harrumphing mentor Dr. Gillespie. As in the movies, the radio Kildare offers engrossing, well produced medical melodramas revolving around the patients and staff at Blair Memorial Hos…

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In the postwar years, MGM adapted many of its movie properties for radio, and one of its most successful transfers was The Story of Dr. Kildare, starring Lew Ayers in the title role of Lionel Barrymore as his crusty, harrumphing mentor Dr. Gillespie. As in the movies, the radio Kildare offers engrossing, well produced medical melodramas revolving around the patients and staff at Blair Memorial Hos…

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In the postwar years, MGM adapted many of its movie properties for radio, and one of its most successful transfers was The Story of Dr. Kildare, starring Lew Ayers in the title role of Lionel Barrymore as his crusty, harrumphing mentor Dr. Gillespie. As in the movies, the radio Kildare offers engrossing, well produced medical melodramas revolving around the patients and staff at Blair Memorial Hos…

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“Adventure! Who among us has not felt the thrill of that word?” begins the introduction to the Strange Adventures radio program from the beginning of the Golden Age of Radio. In the throes of the Great Depression, Strange Adventures offered relief from the troubles of every day life by whisking listeners to faraway places where excitement beckoned and danger lurked around every corner. A barbersho…

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“Dead men’s wills are often strange. We cannot attempt to understand them or try to find the answers. We can but tell the story.” So begins the radio show Strange Wills, a mystery-adventures series syndicated by Teleways beginning in 1946. It starred distinguished Hollywood actor Warren William as probate attorney Warren Francis O’Connell, and the stories were told through his eyes as executor of…

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“Dead men’s wills are often strange. We cannot attempt to understand them or try to find the answers. We can but tell the story.” So begins the radio show Strange Wills, a mystery-adventures series syndicated by Teleways beginning in 1946, continued in Volume 2. It starred distinguished Hollywood actor Warren William as probate attorney Warren Francis O’Connell, and the stories were told through h…

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When Mark Twain's daughter Susie wrote a letter to Santa Claus, her father wrote back, signing Santa's name. Charming and heartwarming, this version of the short letter was recorded as part of Dreamscape's Classic Christmas Stories: A Collection of Timeless Holiday Tales.

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“Suspense” premiered in 1942 and soon became known for its inventive writing and for casting well-known stars in off-beat roles. In 1947, CBS decided to take a gamble: “Suspense” was turned into a full-hour Saturday night feature, hosted by actor and occasional star Robert Montgomery. Many of the hour-long shows were movie adaptations and, with the permission of the original writers, several earli…

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Volume 2 of Suspense! “Radio’s Theater of Thrills” premiered in 1942 and, from the start, producer William Spier strived for a tense, edge-of-your-seat kind of program that would both grab and keep the attention of listeners. As it increased in popularity, “Suspense” began to attract Hollywood stars, most of whom had seldom been given the chance to really flex their acting muscles on the air. Spie…

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Volume 3 of Suspense! With a history full of twists and turns, Suspense is a program that lives on as one of the best produced of the classic era as well as a collection of tense, well told stories. Show producer William Spier aspired to make Suspense the success it would become. With his actors he expected nothing less than perfection, but was also willing to risk on-air disaster by often throwin…

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Suspense premiered in 1942 and soon became known for its inventive writing and for casting well known stars in offbeat roles. In 1947, CBS decided to take a gamble: Suspense was turned into a full-hour Saturday night feature, hosted by actor and occasional star Robert Montgomery. Many of the hour-long shows were movie adaptations and, with the permission of the original writers, several earlier pr…

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Suspense premiered in 1942 and soon became known for its inventive writing and for casting well known stars in offbeat roles. In 1947, CBS decided to take a gamble: Suspense was turned into a full-hour Saturday night feature, hosted by actor and occasional star Robert Montgomery. Many of the hour-long shows were movie adaptations and, with the permission of the original writers, several earlier pr…

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Prospero and his lovely daughter Miranda live alone on the tiny island where they were marooned years ago, with only the island creatures for company-that is, until a powerful storm brings a boat full of strangers to the island. As the story unfolds, magic and mystery fill the island in this retelling of Shakespeare's classic play.

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Tessa's Surprises is a story about an underprivileged little girl who strives to earn a few coins so she can buy her younger siblings Christmas presents. A heartwarming Christmas tale from Louisa May Alcott.

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First heard in 1937, That Was The Year consisted of 39 fifteen minute long shows featuring historical vignettes dramatizing key moments in the lives of men and women whose contributions had a significant impact on the history of the modern world between the years 1896-1934. Among the intriguing historical nuggets listeners to That Was The Year heard were the faithful recreation of the first demons…

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A ship captain is found dead, stabbed through with a harpoon. Police inspector Stanley Hopkins, who is being mentored by Sherlock Holmes, brings the case to Holmes and Dr. Watson. An abusive man, the captain had many enemies, widening the suspect list. The investigation finds Holmes and company on a stakeout, on a case that involves a chance meetings on the high seas, and stolen securities.

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Sherlock Holmes is hired by a lady who is being harassed by Milverton, a notorious blackmailer who has ruined many people and caused many grief. Though he is determined to stop him, Milverton is very crafty and Holmes is unable to find the evidence necessary to put him away. Finally, Holmes and Watson decide on a daring plan to retrieve their client’s incriminating letters. While there, they witne…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Adventure of Johnnie Waverly,” Poirot investigates the kidnapping of Johnnie Waverly, the three-year-old son of a wealthy couple in Surrey. Could the butler be in on the plot? And why were all the clocks in the house set ten minutes ahead at the time of the kidnapping? This short story originally appeared in the October 10, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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In The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet, a banker, Mr. Alexander Holder, makes a loan of 50,000 pounds to a socially prominent client, who leaves a beryl coronet - one of the most valuable public possessions in existence - as collateral. Feeling that he must not leave this rare and precious piece of jewelry in his personal safe at the bank, he takes it home with him. Awakened by a noise in the night…

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The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle, the only Holmes mystery set during the Christmas season, is the seventh story of twelve in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. During the festive season, newspapers report the theft of the near priceless jewel, The Blue Carbuncle, from the hotel suite of the Countess of Morcar. John Horner, a plumber and a previously convicted felon, is soon arrested for the the…

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In this short story, Hercule Poirot is asked to attend a Christmas celebration in order to apprehend a jewel-thief who has taken advantage of an unwary Eastern prince. Full of English holiday tradition and plenty of intrigue, this holiday tale first appeared in the December 12, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Adventure of the Clapham Cook,” Poirot is asked by a Mrs. Todd to investigate the sudden departure of her cook, Eliza. When elements of the case seem to correspond to miscellaneous articles read aloud from yesterday’s paper to him by Hastings, Poirot begins to unravel a devilishly complex plot. This short story originally appeared in the November 14, 1923 iss…

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In The Adventure of the Copper Beeches, Violet Hunter asks Holmes, whether she should accept a job with very strange conditions. She has been offered 120 pounds per year as a governess, but only if she will cut her long hair short. This is only one of many peculiar conditions to which she must agree. The employer, Jephro Rucastle, seems pleasant enough, yet Miss Hunter obviously has her suspicions…

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A Norfolk country squire from a reputable family hires Holmes to help him learn who has been sending him weird encoded messages, in the form of dancing stick figures, that are disturbing his wife. Upon collecting enough of the messages Holmes cracks the code. He returns to Norfolk to present his findings only to find that his client has been met with tragedy. Using forensic science and his inimita…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Adventure of the Egyptian Tomb,” the widow of a famous Egyptologist consults Poirot on the suspicious death of her husband and an American financier, Bleibner. The mystery takes Poirot and Hastings to Egypt to investigate the site of an archaeological dig. But who could want the two men dead? This short story originally appeared in the September 26, 1923 issu…

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Sherlock Holmes reappears in London after a three-year absence, shocking Dr. Watson who believed his good friend had been killed in a confrontation with Professor Moriarty at Reichenbach Falls. Holmes is compelled to outwit the “second most dangerous man in London” who has a good reason to hope for Holmes’ demise. From the 1905 collection The Return of Sherlock Holmes.

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The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb, is the ninth of the twelve stories collected in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. A young London engineer, contracted to service a hydraulic press at a country house, discovers that the owner is using the machine for illegal purposes. After confronting the owner, the engineer narrowly escapes death and loses a thumb when the owner turns on him. Holmes deduce…

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A young man working as the assistant to a professor has been murdered. While it appears that anyone could have entered the house and committed the murder, a clue in the form of a pair of gold glasses is found near the body. Working on the assumption that the killer wore the glasses as well as several other clues, Holmes comes to the chilling realization that the murderer is still in the house.

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Adventure of the Italian Nobleman,” Poirot and Hastings investigate the suspicious death of Count Foscatini in his apartment in Regent’s Court. Found dead at the dinner table, with three empty dinner plates, suspicion is immediately placed on his two dinner guests. But is there more to the story? This short story originally appeared in the October 24, 1923 is…

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A young rugby player asks Holmes and Watson for help finding his missing teammate before a big game. The client explains that his missing teammate disappeared with an older man after sending a mysterious telegram. Holmes and Watson, using forensic techniques on the telegram, track the missing player to a nearby town. After being stonewalled by the doctor of the missing player, Holmes finally him w…

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In The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor, Miss Hatty Doran, after several strange episodes on the day of her marriage to Lord St. Simon, disappears from the reception. St. Simon tells Holmes that he noticed a change in the young lady's mood just after the wedding ceremony, having been uncharacteristically sharp with him. Also unusual: she dropped her wedding bouquet and a gentleman in the front pew…

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A young lawyer asks Holmes to clear him of the charge of murdering a rich man soon after preparing the man’s will. Inspector Lestrade is convinced of the young attorney’s guilt and believes he has finally bested Holmes, but by the use of forensic science and a bogus house fire, Holmes is able to exonerate the young lawyer while proving he was set-up.

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The distraught head of an elite boarding school hires Holmes and Watson to investigate the sensitive disappearance of the young heir of a local nobleman. Searching in the fields surrounding the school, they make a grisly discovery—the dead body of one of the boy’s teachers. Sensing the growing danger to the young boy and suspecting the interference of the Duke’s secretary, Holmes and Watson questi…

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Watson and Holmes are engaged by the Prime Minister and the European Secretary to help recover a sensitive stolen political document. Tracking the document to a recently murdered spy, Holmes realizes that the European Secretary’s wife actually has the letter. The questions immediately pile up in this tale of international intrigue, blackmail, and double-dealing.

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Someone is destroying small busts of Napoleon Bonaparte. At first merely a nuisance, vandalism quickly turns to murder after one of the statue owners finds a dead man on his doorstep beside a smashed statue. Reasoning his way back to the source of the statues, Holmes determines that there is more to this case than just antipathy towards the great French leader. Can Holmes and Watson solve the myst…

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A young woman explains to Holmes that an unknown man has been following her by bicycle on her weekly trips from the house where she works to the railroad station. Having met two friends of her recently-deceased uncle, one of the men, Carruthers, hires her as a governess and later proposes to her. The young woman, being already engaged, declines. The other man, Woodley, disturbs her with rude behav…

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In The Adventure of the Speckled Band, Sherlock Holmes and Watson come to the aid of Helen Stoner, who has reason to fear her life is being threatened by her abusive stepfather, Dr. Grimesby Roylott. Her sister, who died two years before, spoke of a speckled band right before she died in mysterious circumstances. To solve the mystery of the speckled band, Holmes and Watson stake out Miss Stoner's…

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Sherlock Holmes and Watson, on a research trip in a university town, are approached by a professor. The professor believes someone has entered his office and seen, and perhaps copied, the examination papers he is to administer the next day. Holmes begins by narrowing down the suspects to three students who live nearby. After studying several innocuous pieces of evidence, he believes he has identif…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Adventure of the Western Star,” Poirot investigates the case of a missing diamond, “The Star of the East”, belonging to Lady Yardly. But what is the connection between it and a similar diamond owned by the famous American film actress Mary Marvell? And why does a Chinese man want it returned? This short story originally appeared in the April 11, 1923 issue of…

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In the 1940s, there was no shortage of teen misadventures in the movies or on the air. But America’s most enduring teenage character originally came from the comics - and his name is Archie Andrews. Ever since his debut in 1941, Archie and his pal Jughead, as well as his girlfriends Betty, Veronica, and the rest of the gang at Riverdale High, have brought warm and lighthearted entertainment to mil…

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Doc Savage was originally created for pulp magazines, but with an eye toward radio. Like his big brother, The Shadow, Doc was given a signature sound in the expectation that he would need one to identify himself to radio audiences. Doc's eerie trilling, like The Shadow's distinctive laugh, signaled his presence. Once more that uncanny sound, described by Lester Dent as eerie, with the essence of t…

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Following the events of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn is under the watchful stewardship of the Widow Douglas. However, when he is forced back into his drunken father's custody, Huck fakes his own death and runs off down river. In the process, he meets up with Jim, a runaway slave, and the two become friends as well as travel companions. Their adventures lead them through many twis…

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Volume 9 of The Adventures of Jungle Jim! The pulp era was full of jungle heroes. Jungle Jim is one of the unique ones. He wasn’t a loincloth-clad wild man, but rather Jim Bradley, a resourceful hunter. This gave him a distinctive difference from your run-of-the-mill jungle man. Also, his stomping grounds were located in exotic southeastern Asia. Described as a “gentleman adventurer, a true friend…

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Venture back in time to Victorian London to join literature's greatest detective team, the brilliant Sherlock Holmes and his devoted assistant, Dr. Watson, as they investigate a dozen of their best-known cases. Originally published in 1892, this is the first and best collection of stories about the legendary sleuth. The collection includes one of the author's personal favorites: A Scandal in Bohem…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Adventure of the Cheap Flat,” Poirot’s suspicions are aroused when he hears of a sweetheart deal on a flat. Doing a little freelance investigating, he soon learns that the flat is at the center of a case of international espionage and a potentially fatal double-cross. This short story originally appeared in the May 9, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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A pillar of American literature, Mark Twain's prototypical coming-of-age introduces the iconic Tom Sawyer and his best friend Huckleberry Finn. Tom's panache for mischief and unyielding desire for adventure commonly leads him into trouble, but quick wits and a smooth tongue always navigates him to safety. When Tom and Huck witness a murder and the culpable Injun Joe escapes justice, Tom, who testi…

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In Agatha Christie’s “The Affair at the Victory Ball,” Poirot is enlisted by Chief Inspector Japp to assist in the investigation of a murder at a costumed Ball. Six attendees form a circle of suspicion when a young aristocrat and his fiancée are found dead. Poirot then makes an interesting discovery about the costumes worn by the six friends. This short story originally appeared in the March 7, 19…

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Set in the 1870s, Edith Wharton examines the American elite culture on the East Coast. Newland Archer is a lawyer and heir to one of New York City's most prominent families. He is arraigned to be married to May Welland. Newland is pleased with the prospect, under he meets Countess Ellen Olenska, May's older cousin. Suddenly, Newland begins to doubt his arranged marriage and society's shallow rules…

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Comedy takes something mundane and ordinary and turns it into a masterpiece of hilarity and humor. No classic radio show did this better than “The Aldrich Family.” Spotlighting the adolescent escapades of young Henry and the hijinks that ensued from simple things like a bicycle’s flat tire or an overdue library book. The Aldrich Family features as rich and colorful a cast as any show could. From A…

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Fans of L.M. Montgomery’s Anne Shirley rejoice! Collected here are all eight of the original Anne Shirley books in the order they were published. This collection includes Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of the Island, Anne's House of Dreams, Rainbow Valley, Rilla of Ingleside, Chronicles of Avonlea, and Further Chronicles of Avonlea. Published between 1908 and 1921, these heartwarming…

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The Armageddon Box by Robert Weinberg The sequel to The Devil’s Auction. A friend’s brutal murder brought the seemingly worthless book into Alex Warner’s possession. He had no idea that it held the secret to an age-old mystery and key to unimaginable power. But he discovered that quick enough as he found himself the target of a secret religious cult and a strange Neo-Nazi superman with incredible…

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Unsatisfied with the expectations of Creole society and unhappy with her family life, Edna Pontellier begins to fall in love with the dapper Robert Lebrun. Lebrun's flirtations, along with the lifestyle of renown musician Mademoiselle Reisz, rejuvenates Edna's sense of freedom and independence. However, an affair with the womanizer Alcee Arobin provides Edna with a taste of the danger that comes w…

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In the early twentieth-century, Anthony Patch, a socialite and presumptive heir to a tycoon's fortune, finds himself falling madly in love with another socialite. Self-absorbed and vain, Gloria Gilbert jumps at the chance to marry Anthony, and the pair embark on a downward spiral that illustrates their selfishness and leaves them both unfulfilled.Surrounded by the glitz and the glam of the 1910s,…

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In this parable about the transience of earthly things, a mysterious bell is heard by the inhabitants of a village. They search the forest but are unable to find the source. When a prince and a child eventually discover it, they realize that it is as mysterious and old as nature itself.

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Adventure first appeared in November 1910. Quickly attracting top name authors, it soon became renowned for publishing the type of fiction its name implied. It grew into a powerhouse in the genre fiction field, and was later dubbed by Time magazine, the No. 1 Pulp. Paying top rates, at times published as frequently as thrice per month, a crack editorial staff published adventure fiction in all gen…

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The second addition to The Best of Adventure is A Secret Society. Talbot Mundy was the one Adventure author whose popularity exceeded even that of Lamb, and his character James Schuyler Grim — better known as Jimgrim – is one of his most enduring heroes. An American who initially is a British Secret Service Agent, Jimgrim and his band of fellow adventurers fought their way across the Middle East,…

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In the Orient, American adventurer Peter Moore carved out a reckless reputation as Ren-Beh-Tung, the Man of Bronze - otherwise Peter the Brazen. During the 1930s, he left his mark all over war-torn China, battling bandits, pirates, and warlords. Here, Peter the Brazen faces his greatest challenge and his most implacable foe. The enigmatic Blue Scorpion! Introduced in Cave of the Blue Scorpion, he…

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From the original pulp magazine serial comes a new restored audiobook version of the story Minions of The Moon. Mark Nevins needed an operation. When his surgeon asked him to permit the use of an experimental anesthetic, Mark happily signed on the dotted line. Six thousand years later, he awoke in a barbaric world overrun by futuristic Vikings and creatures so strange they defied the imagination.…

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Drink We Deep by Arthur Leo Zagat is a wild tale of two lost races and an incredible plot to invade the Earth and kill all of its inhabitants. Archeologist Hugh Lambert stumbles upon this unearthly intrusion, and is sucked into a weird vortex of fantasy and terror. Published in 1937, this was one of only two fantasy novels written by Zagat for Argosy. Now in a restored audiobook, this tale contain…

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In The Sapphire Death, Peter the Brazen is thrust by a powerful urge for revenge into a final showdown with his diabolical arch-foe and, knowing that it will be the battle of his life, undergoes a regimen of physical and mental training calculated to transform him from the Man of Bronze into the Man of Chromium. Yes, Peter the Brazen becomes a superman fully prepared to destroy the Man with the Ja…

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Singapore Sammy Shay is the toughest sailor in the South Pacific, scouring the coasts of Malaysia and the hundred of islands in the vicinity, searching for his ne’er-do-well father who abandoned his family when Sammy was only two years old. When Bill Shay left his wife and child, he took with him a will leaving a fortune to Sammy from his grandfather. Sammy wants that document back, along with a m…

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District Attorney tony Quinn had everything to live for. Until a craven criminal destroyed him with a splash of acid across the face. Scarred, blinded, Quinn was forced to retire, a shattered man. But when a medical miracle restored his sight, he decided to resume his crime-fighting career in a strange new way. Still pretending to be sightless, he was inspired by a night-flying creature to become.…

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In an old Chicago railroad house, a crack dealer is robbing his customer - a huge, shrouded figure with a thousand in cold cash and a featureless face. The pusher empties his .44 into the man, who is slammed against a wall by the bullets’ force. But he rises unharmed - and slowly approaches his attacker with a meat cleaver. “My turn,” he utters calmly. He’s the Dark Man, a force of evil... In his…

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In The Boscombe Valley Mystery, Inspector Lestrade summons Holmes to a community in Herefordshire, where a local landowner has been murdered outdoors. The deceased's estranged son is strongly implicated. Holmes, employing his trusty magnifying glass quickly determines that a mysterious third man may be responsible for the crime, unraveling a thread involving a secret criminal past, thwarted love,…

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Originally published in a 1896 edition of The Home Monthly, The Burglar's Christmas tells the story Crawford, a homeless man in Chicago who has not eaten recently and considers stealing food on Christmas Eve. Reminiscent of The Parable of the Prodigal Son, this tale reflects on the nature of forgiveness. This recording of The Burglar's Christmas was recorded as part of Dreamscape’s Classic Christm…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Case of the Missing Will,” Poirot must help clever student Violet Marsh meet the terms of an unusual will by her Uncle Andrew. She must live in his house for a month and “prove her wits” if she is ever to receive his fortune. But is there another will? This short story originally appeared in the October 31, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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Originally published in the 1852 Christmas edition of Dickens' journal Household Words, The Child's Story is the account of a man's life from childhood to the present as told to his grandson in the form of a fairytale about a traveler and the people he meets. This version of The Child's Story is part of Dreamscape's The Christmas Stories of Charles Dickens.

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In the 1840s Charles Dickens wrote 5 short stories with strong social and moral messages. The Chimes: A Goblin Story of Some Bells that Rand an Old Year Out and a New Year In, is the second of these stories, whose predecessor was the famous A Christmas Carol. The Chimes focuses on Trotty, a poor elderly messenger who is filled with gloom over reports of crime and immorality in the newspapers. Afte…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Chocolate Box,” Poirot describes a case he was unable to solve. Investigating the apparent poisoning of a popular Belgian civil servant, Poirot goes undercover to expose the murderer, only to discover the case is not so tidy as he thinks. But who could have wanted the man dead? This short story originally appeared in the May 23, 1923 issue of The Sketch magaz…

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Hopalong Cassidy is an iconic western cowboy hero conceived by Clarence Mulford, but immortalized in a series of films starring William Boyd from 1935-1948. A tough-talking and violent character in the print novels, Cassidy was remade into a clean-cut hero who traveled the West with his sidekicks fighting villains who took advantage of the weak. Clarence E Mulford takes you back to the beginning b…

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New York-based private investigator Cass Blue is a morally flexible tough guy who backs up his hard-boiled rhetoric with frequent applications of the blackjack he carries in a hip pocket. No case is too seedy or sordid for him to take, and he's capable of taking as much as he dishes out when it's necessary. The cops don't trust him much more than they do the criminals, but that doesn't keep him fr…

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Enjoy the adventures of Max Latin, the detective who doesn't want to be a detective! Author Norbert Davis mixed the classic hard-boiled style with humor, making Max Latin unique in pulp fiction. Appearing for five screwball stories in Dime Detective, this new edition includes an authoritative introduction by fellow Dime Detective scribe, John D. MacDonald. Includes the stories, Watch Me Kill You!”…

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Twins Judy and Jimmy Barton crawl into their attic one December day, searching everywhere for the silver star that always sits atop their Christmas tree. Soon their search crosses the path of little Paddy O’Cinnamon, The Cinnamon Bear, who has shoe-button eyes and a ferocious growl. He shows them a small hole through which the Crazy Quilt Dragon had absconded with their star and invites Judy and J…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Cornish Mystery,” Poirot is asked to help a Cornwall woman who believes she is being poisoned by her husband. When Poirot and Hastings visit her home, they are shocked to find she has died. But is it really her husband who did the poisoning? This short story originally appeared in the November 28, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald, originally published in Colliers Magazine on May 27th, 1922. The story follows Benjamin's life from his birth in 1860. However he is no ordinary child, as he has the appearance of a 70 year old man, already capable of speech. His family soon realizes that Benjamin is aging in reverse, becoming younger as the years go by.…

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His name is Satni Jambres. It means nothing now, but thirty centuries ago, he was the most feared sorcerer in the world. None dared challenge him, for his magic was fueled by the dark gods of the night. Then, in a surprising twist of fate, a stranger, a one-time slave, brought him to his knees—defeated him using magic that even Jambres could not withstand. Now, the master mage has returned, resurr…

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Hailed as one of the world's supreme masterpieces on the subject of death and dying, The Death of Ivan Ilyich is the story of a worldly careerist, a high court judge who has never given the inevitability of his death so much as a passing thought. But one day death announces itself to him, and to his shocked surprise he is brought face to face with his own mortality. How, Tolstoy asks, does an unre…

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Held once each generation and attended by the greatest mages in the world, the Auction offered a prize of incredible power to the winner. But, what happened to those bidders whose offers didn’t meet the final price? Valerie Lancaster had no desire to attend the Auction. But when her father was murdered for his invitation, she knew she had to go to find his killer — and keep from being slain hersel…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Disappearance of Mr. Davenheim,” to win a bet with Inspector Japp, Poirot solves the mysterious robbery and disappearance of a banker from his home, all without leaving his seat. Is the culprit the businessman Mr. Davenheim was supposed to meet? Or is the situation more complicated? This short story originally appeared in the March 28, 1923 issue of The Sketc…

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Paradiso is the third and final part of The Divine Comedy, Dante's epic poem describing man's progress from hell to salvation. In it, the author progresses through nine concentric spheres of heaven. Corresponding with medieval astronomy, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn deal with the four cardinal virtues Prudence, Fortitude, Justice and Temperance. The remaining two sph…

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Paradiso is the third and final part of The Divine Comedy, Dante's epic poem describing man's progress from hell to salvation. In it, the author progresses through nine concentric spheres of heaven. Corresponding with medieval astronomy, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, the Sun, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn deal with the four cardinal virtues Prudence, Fortitude, Justice and Temperance. The remaining two sph…

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When her district attorney father was slain by vicious criminals, socialite Ellen Patrick took up the trail of vengeance, becoming the masked mystery woman known to greater Los Angeles as the Domino Lady! In this thrilling audiobook, all six of Lars Anderson’s infamous stories have been recorded. Meet this determined gunwoman for justice in “The Domino Lady Collects” and follow her through five ex…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Double Clue,” Poirot investigates the robbery of a collection of medieval jewelry from the safe of a dealer. Since the theft occurred during a dinner party, the suspects could be any of the guests. But which one? This short story originally appeared in the December 5, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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Written in 1924, The Dream tells the story of a man from a Utopian future who dreams the entire life of an Englishman from birth to his untimely death. Weaving the lives of Sarnac, a biologist from the year 4,000 A.D., and Harry, a man whose life was ended too soon, Wells creates a mystical connection between two very different time periods. This classic science-fiction novel with a splash of roma…

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In The Dream of Little Tuk, a little boy named Tuk interrupts his studying to help an old woman carry water. Later, when he goes to sleep, he puts his geography book under his pillow in the hopes that its knowledge will be magically transmitted into his brain. In his dreams, the old woman appears and repays his earlier kindness.

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This collection of twenty-five Hercule Poirot adventures is compiled from short stories written by Agatha Christie for The Sketch magazine in 1923 from March to December. In these stories, including “The Disappearance of Mr. Davenheim,” “The Veiled Lady,” and “The Adventure of the Egyptian Tomb,” the eccentric private detective slowly and surely solves mysteries involving jealousy, revenge, and gr…

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In The Elderbush, a boy arrives home with a cold. His mother whisks him off to bed and prepares some elderflower tea to warm him up. A kindly older neighbor stops by to visit the boy, who asks for a fairy tale. The old man struggles to think of one, but becomes inspired by the aroma of the elderflower tea. A story about how real life can provide subjects for some of the most wonderful fairy tales.…

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The financial stress of rebuilding their family farm leaves Dorothy Gale's family facing mountains of debt. Upon hearing about her aunt and uncle's situation, Dorothy contacts Princess Ozma and arranges for her and her family to live in Oz, where they can be forever safe and at peace.

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In The Emperor's New Clothes, two weavers tell the emperor that they can make him a new suit of clothes that is invisible to people who are unfit for their positions or who are stupid or incompetent. Con men, the two weavers actually outfit the emperor in nothing, but will anyone be willing to tell the emperor that he is naked? As an idiom, the story's title refers to things that are accepted as c…

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In this fable about what happens to liars and boasters, a gentleman's collar decides to marry and proposes to various female objects, embroidering his accomplishments and good qualities at every turn.

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In this moralistic tale about appreciating what you have, a young fir tree is so fixated on growing up that he does not value his life in the forest. When he is chopped down and decorated for a family's Christmas decorations, he expects this to be the beginning of a great career. Sadly, this is not to be. First published in 1844 alongside The Snow Queen.

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In The Five Orange Pips, a young Sussex gentleman named John Openshaw tells the strange story of his uncle Elias Openshaw, who came back to England after living in the United States as a planter in Florida and serving as a colonel in the Confederate Army. His uncle begins receiving threatening letters inscribed KKK and including five orange pips. He is killed shortly thereafter. The job of unravel…

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Originally published in a 1905 edition of The New York Sunday World, The Gift of the Magi tells the story of a young couple at Christmas when money is tight, offering important insight into the nature of gift-giving. A well-known example of comic irony, it has been widely adapted as everything from an Off-Broadway show to television episodes. This recording of The Gift of the Magi was recorded as…

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The Gold-Bug is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in 1843. The plot centers on a secret message that will lead to a buried treasure. Aware of the growing popularity of cryptography and code-breaking, Poe submitted this story to a writing contest sponsored by a Philadelphia newspaper. Winning the grand prize of $100, the story was then published in three installments beginning in June 1843…

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The year is 1922, and young Nick Carraway moves to the village of West Egg, where he discovers that his neighbor is the eclectic millionaire Jay Gatsby. As he and Gatsby become acquainted, Nick is thrown into a world full of dazzling parties, unrequited love, and unchecked idealism. Gatsby, surrounded by riches, yearns for the love of a woman who chose another man. He waits for her every night, us…

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When millionaire Jethro Dumont disappeared into the mystic fastness of Tibet, the world thought him lost forever. But he came back with a sacred mission: to eradicate evil and all suffering that originates from wickedness. Donning the emerald robes of a Tibetan monk, Dumont became The Green Lama, a relentless scourge of the Underworld. Aided by ordinary people from all walks of life, guided by the…

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The Green Lama returns for two new adventures torn from the pages of Double Detective magazine. In reality millionaire Jethro Dumont, he is a graduate of the great Tibetan lamaseries – the first Westerner to be ordained as a Buddhist priest. Dedicating himself to the destruction of evil, Dumont dons the emerald robes of the fearsome Green Lama – a figure of mystery and high purpose. With his team…

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Here are two more thrilling exploits of Jethro Dumont, also known as The Green Lama – the first white man to become an ordained Tibetan priest. Motivated by worldly suffering, the Lama takes up the challenge of organized crime and subversive elements wherever he finds them. Returning to New York after his recent adventures in Hollywood, Jethro finds intrigue and murder aboard the S.S. Cathay, wher…

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Jethro Dumont is back as The Green Lama – the world’s first and foremost Buddhist superhero! The Green lama investigates a series of strange accidents surrounding a traveling circus – which may be more than mere accidents, according to The Clown Who Laughed. Then he travels to a political convention in Chicago to tackle The Case of the Invisible Enemy. Will Fifth columnists succeed in undermining…

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The Green Lama tackles two terrific cases of mystifying murder. When a rogue conjuror commits an unsolvable crime, Jethro Dumont dons the emerald robes of the Green Lama, plunging into the arcane world of stage magic to solve The Case of the Mad Magi. For the mystical powers of the Lama are greater than those of a mere illusionist, no matter how evil. In The Case of The Vanishing Ships, the action…

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In The Happy Family, a pair of snails lives inside a burdock forest near an old manor house. They remember the old days when their kinfolk were served on platters in the old house and suspect the house has since been abandoned. Deciding to grow their family, they adopt a common snail and must arrange a marriage for their new child.

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The Iliad is an epic Greek poem written by philosopher Homer, and is considered one of the oldest pieces of western literature still in existence. The story takes place during the last weeks of the ten year Trojan War, with a focus on the quarrels between King Agamemnon and the legendary warrior Achilles. However, this tale's most famous scene is when the Greek's give a gift to the Trojans of a la…

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First published in 1911, The Innocence of Father Brown contains stories involving one of the greatest characters in the history of detective fiction, Father Brown. He is a Roman Catholic priest, has an uncanny insight to human evil. Rather than the large serial villains in stories such as Sherlock Holmes, the mysteries Father Brown solved were more local murders by small town crooks, narrowing the…

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In Agatha Christie’s “The Jewel Robbery at the Grand Metropolitan,” Poirot and Hastings are called on to solve the case of Mrs. Opalsen’s missing set of pearls, apparently stolen during a stay at the Grand Metropolitan Hotel. The two suspects are Mrs. Opalsen’s maid and the hotel chambermaid, but both blame the other. Who is the real thief? This short story originally appeared in the March 14, 192…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Kidnapped Prime Minister,” Poirot investigates the mysterious disappearance of the British Prime Minister during wartime. Apparently carjacked on the way to a peace conference, Poirot must overcome subterfuge and misdirection to solve the mystery. This short story originally appeared in the April 25, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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In Agatha Christie’s “The King of Clubs,” Poirot investigates the possible double murder of a famous dancer and theater impresario. Could the words of a fortune teller and a playing card provide a solution to the mystery? This short story originally appeared in the March 21, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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In The Leap-Frog, a flea, a grasshopper and a frog arrange a contest to see who can jump highest. The King offers the hand of the princess to the victor. The flea and the grasshopper, victims of their own vanity and ambition are matched against the patient, wise and humble frog. The short tale is a fable about the perils of high self-regard.

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, The Lemesurier Inheritance,” Poirot and Hastings are asked to keep an eye on the heir of a Northumberland estate. The house, thought to be cursed since the Middle Ages, is the locale of several recent near-death accidents for the young boy and rumors of the curse increase. But is it possible the accidents are man-made? This short story originally appeared in the D…

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The Life and Adventures of Santa Clause is a 1902 children's book, written by L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. The book is the origin story of Santa Claus and persuasively explains how he began to deliver toys to children, why he arrives via chimney at night, and how he came to travel by a sleigh pulled by reindeer. Santa Claus appears in several other L. Frank Baum Oz stories,…

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In The Little Match Girl, a barefoot girl tries unsuccessfully to make money for her family by selling matches on the street. Afraid to go home empty-handed and face her father's wrath, she decides to take shelter in an alley for the night and lights matches to keep herself warm. The harsh realism of this story reminds listeners to be grateful and kind during the cold holiday season.

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In “The Locket”, a confederate soldier declines his fellow soldiers’ request to reveal the contents of the locket around his neck. The locket, which holds pictures of his fiancée’s parents and the date of their wedding is found on the battlefield after a battle. Later, the soldier’s fiancée visits the battlefield with the soldier’s father, both shaken with grief. The soldier’s father asks his son’…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Lost Mine,” Poirot investigates the suspicious disappearance of a Chinese businessman in London. Suspicion is focused on two Englishmen, one of whom has an alibi and another who was in an opium den the night of the disappearance. However, a clear-cut case for Poirot soon becomes murky. This short story originally appeared in the November 21, 1923 issue of The…

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Dorothy awakens one morning to discover that Princess Ozma has disappeared, along with several magic items belonging to Glinda and the Wizard. A search party comprising Dorothy, the Wizard, Betsy Bobbin, Trot, and Button-Bright is formed, and the friends set off for the land of the Winkies. But who is behind the mysterious disappearances? The eleventh in the Oz books series, this book has a plot t…

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The Nome Ruggedo and a corrupt munchkin with the secret of magic form an army of wild animals to march upon the Emerald City. Can Dorothy and her friends thwart this nefarious plot? The thirteenth installment in the Oz series, this novel was published a month after author L. Frank Baum’s death and, possibly, as a result, was a bestselling success.

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Anne Beddingfeld is always ready for an adventure. So when she witnesses a man wearing a brown suit die at a tube station in London, she searches for clues and finds a mysterious piece of paper nearby. The message it contains leads her on a confounding chase full of secret aliases and codes as she seeks to solve the case and catch the murderer. Featuring an appearance from Secret Service agent Col…

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Set in early 1900s London, this metaphysical thriller follows undercover officer Gabriel Syme and his secret involvement with Scotland Yard's task force that attempts to take down underground anarchists. In doing so, Syme encounters Lucian Gregory, a passionate anarchist who eventually takes him to the areas secret meeting place. From there Syme influences his peers and eventually is voted to the…

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In The Man with the Twisted Lip, Dr Watson is called upon late at night by a female friend of his wife whose husband has been absent for several days. Frantic with worry, she seeks help in fetching him home from an opium den. Watson finds his friend Sherlock Holmes in the den, disguised as an old man, trying to extract information about a new case from the addicts therein. The case of double ident…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Market Basing Mystery,” Poirot and Hastings are called on to investigate the suspicious death of a landowner in a small English town. What looks at first like a simple case of suicide quickly becomes more complex as Poirot interrogates the suspects in the home. This short story originally appeared in the October 17, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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The most famous of Franz Kafka's works, The Metamorphosis describes a traveling salesman, Gregor Samsa, who wakes up to find himself transformed into a giant insect. This change in his condition does not surprise or shock his family, rather, they look on it as an impending burden. Subtexts include how society's perceptions of differences, the loneliness of isolation, and the absurdity of the human…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Million Dollar Bond Robbery,” Poirot must prove the innocence of a young bank manager who has had a million dollars in bonds stolen from him while on a boat voyage to New York. Could it be one of his superiors? And why were the bonds being sold in New York before his ship arrived? This short story originally appeared in the May 2, 1923 issue of The Sketch mag…

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Where does fantasy end and horror begin? Is there beauty in terror? Does horror possess a spiritual dimension? In these five classic tales written by acknowledged masters of the supernatural, these haunting questions are explored…but not fully answered. First, in A. Merritt’s haunting “The Moon Pool,” a moonlit pool nestled among cyclopean ruins harbors a vampiric dweller both beautiful and terrib…

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When Sanger Rainsford falls off his yacht on his way to the Amazon forest for a hunting expedition, he washes up on a strange Caribbean island only to find that more danger lies ahead. When the owner of a palatial chateau and his henchman tell Rainsford that they are no longer interested in hunting animals and that men are the true test of a hunter, Rainsford goes from being the hunter to the hunt…

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When a man is found dead in a freshly dug grave adjacent to a golf course, Hercule Poirot and Captain Hastings arrive on the scene only to be met by a hostile local police detective who is unwilling to share information. But Poirot’s methodical investigation slowly and surely reveals the real killer amid a host of suspects and clues, including an impassioned love letter and heavy lead piping found…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Mystery of Hunter's Lodge,” Poirot and Hastings are enlisted by a Mr. Roger Havering to help investigate the murder of his aristocrat uncle at his hunting lodge. Hastings discusses the murder with the housekeeper on the scene, but Poirot quickly deduces that her story doesn’t add up. This short story appeared in the May 16, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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In The Naughty Boy, an old poet welcomes a wet and shivering boy into his home to warm up, not realizing that the boy has an ulterior motive-and a bow and arrow. This short tale ruminates on the naughtiness and ubiquity of Cupid.

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The Odyssey is an epic poem, written by the ancient Greek Philosopher Homer, and is considered to be the second oldest piece of western literature still in existence. Scholars believe it was written at the end of the 8th century BC. Still heavily used in schools because of its unique literary makeup and historical value, the poems follow Greek hero Odysseus, as he journeys home after the ten year…

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In The Old House, a boy is invited to meet the old man across the street and offers him a gift of a toy soldier. The toy soldier, unhappy with his new surroundings, flings himself through a hole in the floor and disappears. After the old man dies, the old house is torn down, and a new one is built, but the toy soldier remains to be rediscovered.

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A young munchkin boy named Ojo embarks on a quest to save his grandfather who has been petrified by a magician. On his quest, he is joined by a life-sized patchwork doll named Scraps. Along the way, he encounters Dorothy, the Scarecrow, and the Tin Man. The seventh in the Oz books series, this novel was adapted into a 1914 silent film of the same name produced by L. Frank Baum’s Oz Film Manufactur…

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The Pecos Kid was really William Calhoun Warren, late of Texas and the Confederate Army. After the Civil War, he set out to make an honest living, assisted by his saddle mates, Big Jim Swing and Hernandez Pedro Gonzales y Fuente Jesus Maria Flanagan. The series was created to reflect the shift toward more mature Western films, which had been growing on Hollywood over much of the 1940s. In his debu…

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In Agatha Christie’s short story, “The Plymouth Express,” a rich young American woman is found murdered on the train from Bristol to Plymouth and her valuable jewelry missing. Poirot’s suspects include her indebted gambler husband, her French adventurer lover, and her maid. But where is the murder weapon? This short story originally appeared in the April 4, 1923 issue of The Sketch magazine.

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Originally published in the 1852 Christmas edition of Dickens' journal Household Words, The Poor Relation's Story takes place during a Christmas feast, where a poor relation of the host tells the story of his life. This version of The Poor Relation's Story is part of Dreamscape's The Christmas Stories of Charles Dickens.

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From his perspective in Renaissance Italy, Machiavelli's aim in this classic work was to resolve conflict with the ruling prince, Lorenzo de Medici. Machiavelli based his insights on the way people really are rather than an ideal of how they should be. This is the world's most famous master plan for seizing and holding power. Astonishing in its candor The Prince even today remains a disturbingly r…

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In The Princess and the Pea a prince who wants to marry a princess finds it difficult to ascertain whether a princess is authentically noble. On a stormy night, a bedraggled young woman claiming to be a princess seeks shelter in the prince's castle. The Prince's mother tests the girl's claim by placing three peas underneath the twenty mattresses laid out for her. A humorous tale about the absurdit…

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In The Quiet Little Woman a lonely orphan girl named Patty, desires only for a family to love her. When a family finally does come for Patty, she learns it is because they need a servant. But it happens that there is one person who cares about Patty, whose life will soon change forever. Written as a gift to five earnest fans of Little Women, this Louisa May Alcott Christmas story has become a holi…

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When an American man discovers that he's the last descendant of the De la Poer family, he travels to England to take over their crumbling estate. Accompanied only by his cat, the man follows the incessant sound of rats to a dark place beneath the estate, unearthing horrible, dark, gruesome secrets about his ancestors and the type of activities they partook in. Taken by madness, the man falls into…

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In The Red Shoes, a peasant girl named Karen is adopted by a rich old lady and grows up vain and spoiled. She is so enamored of a new pair of red shoes that she wears them to church in spite of a warning to only wear black shoes there. She soon learns that ignoring that warning was a bad idea: a mysterious old soldier at the church charms the red shoes with a tap of his hand. This cautionary tale…

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The Red-Headed League is the second of the twelve stories in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, which was published in 1892. In it, Jabez Wilson, a flame-haired London pawnbroker, comes to consult Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson. Some weeks before, Wilson responded to a newspaper want-ad offering highly-paid work to only red-headed male applicants. Wilson is hired on the basis of the precise hue…

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The thirteen mysteries in this collection were originally published in The Strand Magazine and Collier's in Great Britain and the United States. Published in 1905, this book was the first Holmes collection since 1893, when Holmes died in a confrontation with his arch-nemesis Professor Moriarty in The Final Problem. The success of The Hound of the Baskervilles, which was published in 1901–1902 and…

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Dorothy Gale and her little dog Toto find themselves traveling through mystical places on their way to Oz. Accompanied by a kind stranger and some other characters, Dorothy follows the road through Foxville and realizes they will make it to the Land of Oz in time for Princess Ozma's royal birthday party. Once the band reaches Oz, Dorothy is met with some familiar faces as the celebration begins.

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Cap’n Bill, a little girl named Trot, and Button-Bright are marooned in Jinxland, a mountainous region adjacent to Oz but separated by a bottomless chasm. While there, they get embroiled in a political rivalry between good King Kynd and the notorious usurper Krewl. When the Scarecrow gets wind of the trouble via Glinda’s Great Book of Records (a kind of precursor to the internet), he joins the fig…

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In 1642, a pregnant Hester Prynne is found guilty of adultery, shunned by her neighbors, and forced to wear a scarlet letter 'A' on her dress. Meanwhile, Hester's husband - long thought to be lost at sea - has returned to Boston under the assumed name 'Roger Chillingworth' and plots to uncover her lover's identity. After her daughter Pearl is born, Hester is frequently visited by both Reverend Dim…

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Originally published in the 1853 Christmas edition of Dickens' journal Household Words, The Schoolboy's Story recounts the tale of Old Cheeseman, a schoolboy who becomes the second Latin Master, and his former peers who consider him a traitor for doing it. This version of The Schoolboy's Story is part of Dreamscape's The Christmas Stories of Charles Dickens.

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The dreaded Skull Killer returns! Jeffrey Fairchild, alias of the kindly crime-crushing Skull Killer and the hero of the first issue of The Octopus, is back for another run against the insane leader of the Purple Eyes cult. But this time, the malevolent mastermind is not the Octopus, but his sinister successor, the diabolical Scorpion! Branded with a scorpion symbol on his face, this new titan of…

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Marking the first appearance of Agatha Christie's character Inspector Battle, The Secret of Chimneys was first published in 1925 and went on to be a hit among readers. This mystery novel follows Anthony Cade, a man who unknowingly finds himself in the middle of an international conspiracy and a murder investigation after accepting a simple delivery job from an old friend. As Cade slowly begins to…

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In this bleak fairytale, a kind and good-natured learned man on vacation sends his shadow to investigate a balcony across the street. When his shadow never returns, he notices that he has grown a new one and figures all is well. However, five years later, he meets his original shadow, and it is now corporeal-but it doesn't share his principles. As the shadow grows in strength, the man weakens, rai…

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In The Shoes of Fortune a series of people who are dissatisfied with their lives, put on a pair of magic shoes that grants them the wishes. A civil servant who idealizes the middle ages, experiences all its inconveniences; a watchman lives the lonely life of his superior and endures a terrifying visit to the moon. The shoes pass from owner to owner until one exhausted wearer who wishes for rest an…

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This classic story by Hans Christian Andersen follows two young children who are best friends and neighbors. When a troll wants to mirror the uglieness in all things, he creates a mirror to do so. But when it breaks, the boy named Kai gets flecks of glass in his eyes and heart, which harden his heart. He leaves his friend Gerda and his family, and goes off with the Snow Queen, whose two kisses mak…

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After studying piano as a child, Thea Kronborg leaves her family and their frontier town of Moonstone, Colorado to pursue music in Chicago. There, her instructor insists that her singing voice is her greater gift, and she begins to work on mastering her craft. Seeking to become one of the world’s greatest opera singers, she embarks on a journey of self-discovery and fulfillment that takes her acro…

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In The Story of a Fierce Bad Rabbit, a bad rabbit steals a carrot from a good rabbit and scratches him in the process. When a hunter mistakes the bad rabbit for a bird, the bad rabbit inadvertently receives his just desserts. The ninth of Beatrix Potter's 22 charmingly illustrated tales of animals in amusing situations, The Story of a Fierce Bad Rabbit has served as a warning to naughty children s…

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In The Story of a Mother, a mother, watching over her sick child, briefly closes her eyes, and Death comes. Rushing outside to pursue Death, she encounters various spirits who offer conditional advice. When she finally finds her child, Death offers her a terrible choice. First published in 1847, this story has been adapted for film several times.

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Doctor John Dolittle loves animals. He loves to help them, heal them, and even lets them live in his home and his office. When Polynesia the Parrot teaches him the language of animals, Doctor Dolittle becomes a world-famous doctor, traveling to animals in almost every country so he can learn about what ails them and how he can help them.

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In The Story of Miss Moppet, a kitten who is teased by a mouse bumps her head on a cupboard. The kitten feigns illness by sitting by the fire and wrapping her head in a duster. Will this ruse be enough to lure the curious mouse? The tenth of Beatrix Potter's 22 charmingly illustrated tales of animals in amusing situations, The Story of Miss Moppet has served children as a general introduction to b…